SGA prepares for next academic year

first_imgThe other priority is the SGA retreat, which Chesley said was very important for members. Held before classes start next semester, it will help the officers to get to know one another so that they can work together for the student body as efficiently as possible. Some of the suggestions the Board members had were creating a Facebook fan page, using Twitter and developing a newsletter.  The first step the board took in this process was to state the three goals to be put on the top of SGA’s list of priorities. Those goals are increasing the visibility of SGA and its members on campus, the appeal of life on Saint Mary’s campus and the SGA initiation retreat at the beginning of the year.  “First we had to establish where we were and where we want to get during the coming year,” Chesley said. “Now, we have to figure out the best way to get there.”  The suggestion the board decided will be the most efficient is to develop the SGA Web site. They plan to add resources for students. It was also suggested members spend time doing small things around campus like handing out stickers or candy. center_img Saint Mary’s Student Government Association (SGA) discussed preparations for the 2010-11 academic year at its meeting on Wednesday night.At the last meeting, the board named specific goals and expectations and on Wednesday began to prioritize and create plans for those goals. SGA president Rachael Chesley said organization would be very important in SGA’s efficiency.   “I think we all feel that being recognizable and seen around campus is very important, so that students know who we are and what we can do for them,” Chesley said. “Now, we have to figure out the best way to go about doing that.” “I think it is very important that SGA commits to doing small fun things around campus regularly,” chief of staff Katrina Mesina said. “We may be working on large projects for the school for a long time, but the students won’t see that. So, we have to do small things around campus to connect with the student body.” last_img read more

Blue-Gold weekend to bring crowds

first_imgTomorrow the Blue-Gold Game returns for the 81st time, bringing with it a fresh surge of Irish pride. As in years past, thousands will flock to campus to get a glimpse at how the team will operate this fall. Unlike many other years, however, a new fascination has latched itself to the weekend.“Everybody is just so excited to see [Irish coach Brian] Kelly, and this is going to be the public’s first glimpse to see him in action and what he’s done to the team,” Game Day Operations Director Mike Seamon said. “If the weather cooperates, we are expecting to see huge crowds. Even with crowds, we are expecting 20,000. It could be 20,000 to 50,000.  We are prepared for both.”Seamon said the game would be one of the season’s most popular events.“I think next to Commencement, which is just focused on graduating seniors, this is clearly the biggest weekend in the spring here at Notre Dame,” he said. Although this weekend’s game is eight decades running, the activities and events featured will be anything but monotonous.“Given the tremendous interests in Coach Kelly, I think its safe to say there will be unprecedented activities and events this weekend,” Seamon said. “It’s going to be bigger than anything we’ve done in the past.”Notre Dame students are especially eager to gauge from the scrimmage how the team has already shifted under their new coach’s direction.“Last year’s game was really exciting. Just to be in the stadium in the spring really pumped me up for the fall season,” sophomore Alexandra Unger said. “I think this Blue and Gold game will be even better because the football team is feeling really enthusiastic and Brian Kelly is causing a lot of excitement.”The University will kick off the weekend Friday from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. with a fan festival, open to the public, on the Irish Green, featuring games, food and activities.That afternoon the University will reveal the new The Shirt.“It’s going to start off with The Shirt unveiling at four at the bookstore. The new cheerleaders and the leprechaun and a number of other student groups will be there,” Seamon said. “Coach Kelly himself will unveil The Shirt itself at 5:45.”Besides football, other Irish sports teams are also hosting home games this weekend which the University has incorporated into the events of the weekend.“We are also dedicating the new Alumni Soccer Stadium,” Seamon said. “The men’s and women’s soccer teams are playing there Friday night.”The baseball, softball teams will play on campus, and the women’s Big East tennis championships will be on campus as well, Seamon said.Blue-Gold weekend ends Sunday with the South Bend Symphony playing at the Purcell Pavilion.The event will feature over 700 musicians, Seamon said.last_img read more

Friedman to address recent book at Forum’s signature event

first_img Forum organizers and participants said they feel they have adequately addressed many of the questions that arise when discussing the marketplace and the common good, but it is ultimately up to the students to take the information the Forum provides and apply it to their lives. “We’ve had a lot of positive feedback,” said senior Shanna Gast, a member of the working committee for the Forum and a panelist at tonight’s event. “The tickets for the Forum event with Friedman sold out in an hour and fifteen minutes so it’s clear students are looking forward to what’s to come.” Friedman’s lecture may be the signature event of this year’s Forum, but committee members and University professors who participated in the Forum’s satellite events that were held over the past two months, believe that the issues addressed at these panels helped prepare the audience for the topics Friedman will discuss. “The panel is there to ask more informed questions and to probe a bit more into what Friedman will talk about,” Gast said. “I think the Forum events have been excellent and have done a much better job at engaging the students,” said Peter Kilpatrick, dean of Engineering and a panelist in the Oct. 12 Technology: Boon or Bane Forum satellite event. “If you don’t prepare for the [Friedman] Forum event well, it will be more entertainment for the students than academic.” Other students who have been involved in the development of the Forum throughout the year hope Friedman’s lecture and the issues he addresses will resonate with students. A roundtable discussion will follow Friedman’s talk and will feature Dr. Carolyn Woo, the Martin J. Gillen Dean of the Mendoza College of Business, Gary Anderson, Hesburgh Professor of Catholic Theology and Gast. Andrea Mitchell, Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent for NBC News, will moderate the discussion. “I hope that students will be able to take away concrete, realistic ways that we can be more responsible as global citizens,” said junior Shannon Crotty, a member of the working committee for the Forum. Since one of the main goals of the Forum was to facilitate discussion among as many students as possible, Forum committee members ensured that students who did not secure a ticket to the signature event this evening would still have a chance to participate in the conversation. Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and New York Times columnist Tom Friedman will speak tonight about the global economy’s relationship to the common good at the Notre Dame Forum’s signature event. The event, which features a lecture given by Friedman about issues he addressed in his most recent book “Hot, Flat, and Crowded,” has been highly anticipated by students and others involved in this year’s Forum. “To me, one of the greatest things about the Forum topic of ‘The Global Marketplace and the Common Good’ is that it can be approached from a number of stances,” she said. “The panels and discussions from the perspectives of business and legal professionals, engineering experts and political and theological commentators have definitely addressed the issue comprehensively.”center_img “One of the main points we’re hoping students get out of the Forum is to ask themselves why these topics matter to them as students,” Gast said. “I hope it sheds light on mundane, everyday action that can affect the common good.” “Friedman is very vocal on topics of globalization, income gaps and issues that arise when discussing the common good,” Gast said. “He brings a more informed perspective to the topic and he’s a really big name which brings more awareness.” University professors who participated in the satellite events agreed with Crotty’s sentiment and said the smaller events allowed more students to actively participate in the Forum. Friedman was selected as the speaker for this year’s signature event because of his writings on the marketplace and his critique of certain economic practices. “I’m really happy with how the Forum has developed so far,” Crotty said. “The new Forum format, with multiple events and opportunities for discussions rather than just one larger event, definitely allows for more students and faculty to become engaged with the forum topic.” Crotty said she feels like the satellite events served their purpose in preparing students for the Friedman lecture tonight, and the additional panels added more substance to the theme of the Forum. “Me and my colleagues on the panel had different ways of approaching the issue at hand,” Fernando said. “It’s good to come from different angles and viewpoints because the issue is complex that stretches across social and technological arenas.” Professor Harindra Fernando, a panelist in the same event as Kilpatrick, said the satellite events allowed students to hear a variety of viewpoints concerning complicated issues, which is something that the previous Forum format did not always allow. “Anyone not able to get tickets can watch the event broadcast on Channel 13, the TVs in LaFortune or in the Jordan Auditorium of Mendoza,” Crotty said. “Hopefully, this will allow for more people to become engaged in the discussions following the event.”last_img read more

Panel affirms immorality of capital punishment

first_imgTwo Notre Dame professors and a retired local priest asserted capital punishment is immoral at a Wednesday panel discussion. Adjunct Instructor of Writing and Rhetoric Ed Kelly said he opposes the death penalty for three reasons. “First of all, there are systems of privilege and oppression in place in this country that I think make it virtually impossible for the death penalty to be applied fairly and justly,” he said. “Consequently, we have many people of color and many, many poor people who find themselves on death row, and that’s unfair.” Kelly said he believes it is impossible to combat violence with violence, and that state-sanctioned violence is nonsensical. He said he also opposes the death penalty because people who are not imprisoned often have much more in common with prisoners than they expect. “I have four children,” Kelly said. “None of my daughters has been raped. Our only son has not been killed … Still, I would argue that all people are redeemable, that redemption is possible for everyone. Thus, I’m opposed to the death penalty.” Fr. Tom McNally, a retired priest who volunteers as a chaplain at the Indiana State Prison, shared his experience speaking with prisoners on death row shortly before their executions. He said tensions run high in the small rooms where executions occur near midnight. “The men come in [and] they’re on a gurney,” McNally said. “I always wave and bless them, a last blessing, and they wave back … They close the blinds, and then a poison is injected … All the time that this is going on, there’s just this heaviness in my heart.” McNally said his experiences witnessing prisoners’ executions have caused him to consider capital punishment “terribly unfair.” Jay Tidmarsh, a professor of law, said capital punishment is unjust because some prosecutors will ask a court to put a prisoner to death while others will not. “Different prosecutors in the state have different attitudes,” Tidmarsh said. “The arbitrariness in that sense of the death penalty is, to me, stunning. It’s not the quality of the act [that determines whether someone is put to death] … In many circumstances, it is the quality of the person who decides whether or not to seek the death penalty.” The judicial system deludes all involved to believe they are not responsible for putting someone to death, Tidmarsh said. “We’re supposed to have systems of rules that are relatively fair and neutral,” he said. “The reality is in our system no one actually is responsible for putting someone to death. We have divided up the system of responsibility in such a way where it’s always somebody else, or we believe, at least, that it’s always somebody else.” Tidmarsh said the Supreme Court has made clear that automatic death sentences for certain crimes are unconstitutional. Instead, whether someone is put to death must be decided on a case-by-case basis. “You have to allow individuals to mitigate, to explain,” Tidmarsh said. “It can’t be automatic.” Kelly said he does not believe capital punishment does not deter crime. “In fact … the surest way to make a person violent is to punish him, and of course, capital punishment is the worst form of punishment,” he said. It is difficult, however, to argue capital punishment is “cruel and unusual,” as described by the United States Constitution, Tidmarsh said. “If you believe that the Constitution ought to be interpreted faithfully to the meaning of the people who originally adopted it, they executed people back then for lots of crimes that today we would never execute someone for,” he said “[But] what wasn’t cruel 200 years ago might be cruel today.” If most states abolish the death penalty, the Supreme Court might rule capital punishment cruel and unusual under evolving notions of decency, Tidmarsh said. Kelly said although he is generally in favor of sentencing prisoners of capital crimes to life imprisonment, parole should be possible for prisoners who prove they have changed for the better. “What you really need to do is take prisoners who have been put in prison and have them work on transforming,” he said. “It’s quite possible for the lives of people who have done terrible things to be halfway decent, even the imprisoned.” Tidmarsh said he thinks many prisoners are sentenced to death because victims’ families demonstrate an unwillingness to forgive the perpetrators. Kelly said executing criminals rarely helps family members heal. “People talk about closure,” he said. “But there’s really no closure for many families.” It is important for Catholics to oppose the death penalty, Kelly said. “I think Sr. [Helen] Prejean [an advocate for the abolition of capital punishment] would argue that all life is sacred, not just innocent life,” he said. “And if you believe all life is sacred, how can you believe capital punishment is okay?”,Two Notre Dame professors and a retired local priest asserted capital punishment is immoral at a Wednesday panel discussion. Adjunct Instructor of Writing and Rhetoric Ed Kelly said he opposes the death penalty for three reasons. “First of all, there are systems of privilege and oppression in place in this country that I think make it virtually impossible for the death penalty to be applied fairly and justly,” he said. “Consequently, we have many people of color and many, many poor people who find themselves on death row, and that’s unfair.” Kelly said he believes it is impossible to combat violence with violence, and that state-sanctioned violence is nonsensical. He said he also opposes the death penalty because people who are not imprisoned often have much more in common with prisoners than they expect. “I have four children,” Kelly said. “None of my daughters has been raped. Our only son has not been killed … Still, I would argue that all people are redeemable, that redemption is possible for everyone. Thus, I’m opposed to the death penalty.” Fr. Tom McNally, a retired priest who volunteers as a chaplain at the Indiana State Prison, shared his experience speaking with prisoners on death row shortly before their executions. He said tensions run high in the small rooms where executions occur near midnight. “The men come in [and] they’re on a gurney,” McNally said. “I always wave and bless them, a last blessing, and they wave back … They close the blinds, and then a poison is injected … All the time that this is going on, there’s just this heaviness in my heart.” McNally said his experiences witnessing prisoners’ executions have caused him to consider capital punishment “terribly unfair.” Jay Tidmarsh, a professor of law, said capital punishment is unjust because some prosecutors will ask a court to put a prisoner to death while others will not. “Different prosecutors in the state have different attitudes,” Tidmarsh said. “The arbitrariness in that sense of the death penalty is, to me, stunning. It’s not the quality of the act [that determines whether someone is put to death] … In many circumstances, it is the quality of the person who decides whether or not to seek the death penalty.” The judicial system deludes all involved to believe they are not responsible for putting someone to death, Tidmarsh said. “We’re supposed to have systems of rules that are relatively fair and neutral,” he said. “The reality is in our system no one actually is responsible for putting someone to death. We have divided up the system of responsibility in such a way where it’s always somebody else, or we believe, at least, that it’s always somebody else.” Tidmarsh said the Supreme Court has made clear that automatic death sentences for certain crimes are unconstitutional. Instead, whether someone is put to death must be decided on a case-by-case basis. “You have to allow individuals to mitigate, to explain,” Tidmarsh said. “It can’t be automatic.” Kelly said he does not believe capital punishment does not deter crime. “In fact … the surest way to make a person violent is to punish him, and of course, capital punishment is the worst form of punishment,” he said. It is difficult, however, to argue capital punishment is “cruel and unusual,” as described by the United States Constitution, Tidmarsh said. “If you believe that the Constitution ought to be interpreted faithfully to the meaning of the people who originally adopted it, they executed people back then for lots of crimes that today we would never execute someone for,” he said “[But] what wasn’t cruel 200 years ago might be cruel today.” If most states abolish the death penalty, the Supreme Court might rule capital punishment cruel and unusual under evolving notions of decency, Tidmarsh said. Kelly said although he is generally in favor of sentencing prisoners of capital crimes to life imprisonment, parole should be possible for prisoners who prove they have changed for the better. “What you really need to do is take prisoners who have been put in prison and have them work on transforming,” he said. “It’s quite possible for the lives of people who have done terrible things to be halfway decent, even the imprisoned.” Tidmarsh said he thinks many prisoners are sentenced to death because victims’ families demonstrate an unwillingness to forgive the perpetrators. Kelly said executing criminals rarely helps family members heal. “People talk about closure,” he said. “But there’s really no closure for many families.” It is important for Catholics to oppose the death penalty, Kelly said. “I think Sr. [Helen] Prejean [an advocate for the abolition of capital punishment] would argue that all life is sacred, not just innocent life,” he said. “And if you believe all life is sacred, how can you believe capital punishment is okay?”last_img read more

Snow Day: University closed

first_imgNotre Dame and Saint Mary’s closed due to inclement weather Monday and will remain closed until Tuesday evening.Only essential employees are required to remain on the College’s campus, according to its emergency announcement. In Notre Dame’s emergency notification email, the University instructed snow-essential personnel to contact their supervisors.John Ning As of press time, the dining halls at Saint Mary’s will remain open during their normal operating hours.According to a campuswide email from University spokesman Dennis Brown, Notre Dame’s dining halls will operate on a limited schedule Tuesday. Brunch will be served from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Dinner will be served from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. The LaFortune Student Center and limited eateries will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. for students seeking shelter and food.South Dining Hall manager Marc Poklinkowski said the University’s closure challenged dining hall staffs to maintain services.“The staff has been doing a really good job. … It’s an all-hands-on-deck situation,” Poklinkowski said. “We were getting killed today. Some student staff are staying from the breakfast shift [to help with] the dinner shift tonight.“There’s been a lot of confusion with the University closing. It doesn’t mean we don’t have to come in. We are emergency staff members.”The weather emergency that St. Joseph County authorities declared Monday prompted the University’s closure, according to a message sent to students via ND Alert, the University’s emergency messaging service.Under the weather warning, drivers on the roads after 7 p.m. Monday, except for those with emergency reasons, will be ticketed and finedAccording to a Jan. 7 report in The South Bend Tribune, South Bend Police Capt. Phil Trent said this fine might total 500 dollars if individuals are cited under the state statute that says ignoring a city’s emergency declaration is a misdemeanor.Lt. Matt Blank of the St. Joseph County Police Department told the Tribune that drivers are more likely to be cited under a county ordinance violation, which carries a fine of up to 2,500 dollars. A representative from the South Bend Police Department said, however, that South Bend police officers plan to work off of the city ordinance regarding emergency declarations, which would levy a 25 dollar fine against driversTags: closing, Notre Dame, saint mary’s, weather, Weather Emergency, WInterlast_img read more

Students recount personal 9/11 experiences

first_imgThursday marks not only the 13th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, but also one of the last years Notre Dame students, will distinctly and consciously remember the day’s events.For students from New York City, those memories are particularly vivid.Freshman Jessica Cioffi’s father, Joseph, is a Captain with Engine 247 of the New York City Fire Department, and will soon be promoted to Chief, she said. Cioffi, who is from Staten Island, said Sept. 11, 2001 began much like any other school day, but quickly became confusing and frightening.“I was in school that day, and I didn’t really know what was going on, of course, but everyone started freaking out all of a sudden,” she said. “My dad is a firefighter with the New York City Fire Department, so he was on call that day. What happened is my mom ended up picking me up from school and taking me home.“My dad didn’t come home for three days. He was missing and he was in the rubble. He was trying to find survivors. [He did] a lot of first aid response, trying to help people. It was a really scary time because being so young and innocent, I would ask a bunch of questions like ‘Where’s dad, when’s he coming home?’ And then my mom would burst into tears because she didn’t have the answers.“I remember when my dad called back to let us know that he was okay, that he was safe. It was a very short call, but my mom started crying again. It was just good to know he was safe.”Junior Laura Anderson, who lives in Westchester County, just north of Manhattan, said she recalled a feeling of safety and calm in school despite the turbulent events of the day.“I have very vivid memories of sitting in my first grade class and having my teacher called out in the hallway, and when she came back in she was very obviously upset, her eyes were red from crying,” Anderson said. “As a first grader, I was very confused. Really shortly after that, a ton of parents started coming in and picking up kids. It got to the point at about 10:30 in the morning or so, I think we only had five children left in the classroom.“My teacher used to put on music and dance with us, and on this day when only five of us were left in class, she still tried to keep that sense of normalcy and she put on music and we were waltzing around. I just remember feeling that something was wrong but feeling that I was really safe because everyone was doing a really good job protecting us.”Junior Amber Thomas, whose father is a New York City police officer, said people’s moods and the constant television coverage  made her realize the gravity of the situation, even at a young age.“I knew something happened where all the firefighters and police officers were needed,” Thomas said. “My mom was very anxious and I wasn’t used to seeing her like that.“I remember going home and watching TV and all they kept replaying was this building getting hit by this airplane. It felt like they were playing it on a loop for hours. It was the only thing I saw that day. My mom was on the phone constantly, talking to family members.”Junior Chris Filos, who lives in Scarsdale, north of Manhattan, was home sick from school on Sept. 11, and said he particularly remembered his mother’s anxiety because his father worked in Manhattan.“I was always very good at understanding when something important was going on, when something serious was happening, so I didn’t necessarily know the nature of what was going on, but I knew it was something important,” he said.“My mom kind of forced me into another room. … She shut the door on me because she didn’t want me to see the TV. My mom was really emotionally distressed and frazzled because my dad actually worked in the World Trade Center complex, not in one of the two buildings, but it one of the buildings across the street. Obviously it was impossible to get in touch with anyone that day because all the cell towers were clogged up, so [my mom] had no idea where he was. … Eventually, my dad did come home. … He was covered in a little bit of dust.”Sophomore Julia Kim, who lives in Queens and went to a high school a few blocks from Ground Zero, said the lack of transportation and communication on Sept. 11 only added to the confusion and fear.“Because we were on such high alert, I think you weren’t allowed to take the trains,” she said. “I know some people walked from Manhattan across the bridges. It was a commute that would usually take you 30 minutes had to be walked. None of the phones were working because so many people were using them at the same time.”In the aftermath of the attacks, Anderson said the entire New York community, including school children, mobilized to aid in the recovery effort.“The fact that people kicked in so quickly is amazing,” she said. “The next day, we started making bag lunches to send down to the rescue workers. We were making little boots for the [rescue] dogs because their feet were getting cut and charred.“I think it was really striking to see how people kicked into action so quickly. Almost everything became about ‘How can we help?’ Even the littlest kids [helped]. We were in first grade and we were bagging lunches. All the children were given jobs to help because it allowed us to feel like we were contributing and not just being pushed out and told ‘Don’t watch.’”Cioffi said her father returned to Ground Zero to help with the cleanup for about six months after the attacks.Junior Rachael Biscocho, who lives on Staten Island, said annual remembrances are a special time in New York, where most people were somehow directly affected by the attacks.“On Staten Island especially, I feel like there’s a lot of people who have family members on the police force or in the fire department, and those are some of the greatest casualties from 9/11,” Biscocho said. “So everyone knew at least one person who had been affected by it.”“I love how everyone comes together on that day, though. We all are there to support each other in a time of remembrance.”Coming from an FDNY family, Cioffi said the attacks affected a lot of friends and family.“Because I was brought up with the fire department, I knew a lot of people, people I considered my uncles and other fatherly figures to me, some of whom perished and some of whom got sick afterwards,” she said. “It affects a lot of people more than you think it would.”As he has grown up, Filos said the memories of Sept. 11 become less and less frequent, but he still wants to share his experience to help others better understand the impact of the attacks.“I don’t want to say it’s something I think about often, because it’s not,” he said. “But every once in a while, something sparks a memory and I’ll think about it and reflect on it for a couple of minutes.”“I always enjoy talking about it with people who weren’t there and don’t have those personal experiences, so they can get a better understanding of what it was like to be there and know people who were involved.”Cioffi said the attacks gave her a better appreciation for first responders, like her father.“It makes you appreciate what people do,” she said. “My dad puts his life on the line every time he goes to work, and I was never fully able to realize that until I learned more about the events. Being so young, I never really understood, but as I grew up I was able to learn more about it and appreciate what he does everyday.”Thomas said the memories of the day have stayed with her, and likely will forever.“As I’ve gotten older, it’s always very there. I don’t know how to describe it,” she said. “It’s definitely one of those things where I will never not remember where I was, even though I was 6.”Anderson said the 9/11 attacks have remained an emotional topic, but something people must talk about in order to honor and remember those who died.“Our schools knew this was going to be something that would affect us, so they talked to us about it,” she said. “When you’re at the point where so many of your friends’ families are directly affected … I think they did a good job giving us the resources to be okay and to feel alright, but still making us very aware that we could still help. It was an important thing; we couldn’t just push it aside. We had to do something about it. We had to remember.”Tags: 9/11, FDNY, NYPD, September 11, World Trade Centerlast_img read more

Design professor Robert Sedlack dies at 47

first_imgVisual communication design professor Robert Sedlack, who saw graphic design as a force for social good, died in his sleep at his South Bend home Saturday, the University said in a news release. He was 47.Sedlack taught the course “Design for Social Good” and won the College of Arts and Letters’ Sheedy Excellence in Teaching Award and the Center for Social Concerns’ Gancy Faculty Community-Based Research Award this year. Students in his classes partnered with community organizations like the Center for the Homeless and the Juvenile Justice Center and foundations in Haiti and South Africa, and they “engaged such social issues as racial discrimination, gun control, voter participation, xenophobia, rights of immigrants and the social stigma of HIV/AIDS,” the release said.“I want the students to understand that they can do meaningful work that will benefit others,” Sedlack said, according to the release. “And through these courses, I really think the students begin to understand that design can be used to change lives for the better.”Sedlack grew up in Greencastle, Indiana and graduated from Notre Dame in 1989 and from Indiana University Master of Fine Arts program in 1993. He joined Notre Dame’s faculty in 1998 after working with design firms in Chicago, the release said. In 2001, he redesigned Notre Dame’s shield, typography and color palette.“Robert Sedlack was a visionary leader in the graphic design program at Notre Dame,” Department of Art, Art History and Design chair Richard Gray said in the release. “His approach to design solutions for underserved populations was an exceptional example of turning scholarship into service, of using design to make a difference in the lives of others. Our university has lost an incredible colleague, teacher, mentor, and friend.”There will be hours of visitation from 4 to 6 p.m., followed by a 30 minute wake, all at the Basilica of the Sacred Heart on June 3, according to a University spokesperson. The funeral service will take place June 4 at 9:30 a.m., the release said. Sedlack is survived by his wife Theresa and two children, Emma and Trey.Tags: design for social good, graphic design, Robert Sedlacklast_img read more

Student football equipment managers assist program behind the scenes

first_imgThe student football equipment managers may not have their names on the back of a jersey, but without them the magic of game day would never come to fruition. Since 1920, equipment managers have been working behind the scenes to ensure that football practices and games go as planned. The 24 students currently in the program set up drills for practice, ready the stadium for the games and make the team’s golden helmets shine.Ryan Grooms, head football equipment manager who oversees the student equipment manager program, began working for the University in 2010. In 2012, he adjusted the program — which employs around 12 sophomores, nine juniors and three senior managers each year — to the structure it uses today.“We want it to be a smooth operation where coaches and players don’t have to think about anything … so they can focus on the task at hand — winning football games,” Grooms said.The program is highly competitive and the only equipment managing program that makes cuts, Grooms said.“We’ve got a really great team, a great group of guys and coaches who really appreciate what [student football equipment managers] do,” he said.Interested students start freshman year with a “tryout period,” where they are assigned shadow shifts with experienced returners and learn how the job is done. This year, Grooms said, over 100 freshmen signed up at activities night. From that pool, Grooms chooses around 14 students to continue on as sophomores. The juniors and seniors are chosen partly through a peer evaluation process by the student managers, who take each person’s trustworthiness, honesty, care for Notre Dame football and work ethic into account. Only three are selected to continue on their senior year, Grooms said.The students are paid a scholarship stipend for their work, which increases each year with the time commitment, Grooms said. The three senior managers receive 85 percent of their tuition through the program.Saint Mary’s senior Ashley DeJonge, one of the three senior student managers, described the equipment managers as the people behind the scenes that keep the football program running.“Anything behind the scenes that you would expect to go into a practice or a game day production, we’re doing it,” DeJonge said. “It’s pretty amazing hands-on experience, especially if you love the game and love the atmosphere.”During a regular practice, the equipment managers’ duties might include setting up drills — two managers are assigned to each position — cleaning shoulder pads and helmets, helping out in the equipment room or heat pressing locker numbers into issued gear. In fact, DeJonge said, every single piece of apparel the players wear was distributed to them by the student managers.The managers attend all three practices each week, and all hands are on deck for home games. On game days, managers report to the Guglielmino Athletics Complex in the morning with the players, and set up the field, pylons and drills, DeJonge said. Some managers work inside the locker room at halftime, she said, getting players replacements for ripped jerseys or malfunctioning cleats.After the game, DeJonge said, managers are responsible for helping clean the stadium as well as various equipment items such as shoulder pads.“It’s been really fun being behind the scenes and seeing how the program comes together,” she said. “There’s so many things that I’ve learned about sports programs — especially football in general — that I never thought about going into gameday production.”For most managers who happen to be fans of the sport, it’s a dream come true, DeJonge said, and juniors and seniors get to travel to away games with the team.Junior equipment manager Ryan Green works as a ball boy for the opposing sideline on game days. He said he works with the referees about 15 feet ahead of play and always keeps an eye out for incoming players or coaches, with whom he’s had a few close calls.“How hard the student athletes work isn’t something I had an appreciation for before my job,” Green said. “Though I need to be there for practice, they need to be there before practice for meetings. I need to memorize what coaches need for certain drills, they memorize entire playbooks. That’s what I’ve gained the most out of it. How ridiculously dedicated some of these kids are to playing football for Notre Dame.”Beside standing on the sidelines during games, football equipment managers also have the opportunity to experience things they never have before, making the sacrifice of not tailgating more than worth it, Green said.“I have one of the best seats in the house,” Green said. “During the Temple game, when Josh Adams ran through for a touchdown on the second play of the game I was probably 20 feet away from him, and that was a surreal experience for me.”Tags: equipment managers, football, Football Friday Featurelast_img read more

Podcast examines free speech on campus

first_imgSophomore Evan DaCosta hosted the second installment of the “Pod. Country. Notre Dame.” podcast series Tuesday night to discuss free speech on college campuses. The event was held in the LaFortune ballroom and featured a panel composed of seniors Armani Vaniko Porter and Brendan Clemente, along with sophomore Nicholas Marr.Editor’s note: DaCosta is a News writer and Marr is a Viewpoint columnist for The Observer.DaCosta posed questions to the three students regarding the right to free speech, the relationship between freedom of expression and hate crimes and asked their thoughts on bringing controversial speakers to college campuses. Throughout the panel, all three students unanimously expressed the need to protect freedom of expression, but each focused on different reasons for its importance. Marr said he believes that amidst the various controversial speakers and opinions surfacing in recent years, speakers and academics in pursuit of truth are worth the listen.“[Notre Dame students] have a bigger personal duty to pursue truth and seek truth because religion challenges us to do so,” he said. “That’s why Notre Dame has such a great place in higher education.” Clemente closely followed Marr’s emphasis on truth by referencing Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes.“The best remedy for a bad idea is a good idea,” he said “The good ideas, the right ones, the truth, will come through the marketplace and exchange of ideas.”Clemente said it is through active conversation and this exchange of ideas that hateful rhetoric, such as racism, can be overturned.While Marr and Clemente focused on those who are participating in conversations and utilizing free speech, Porter said he was more interested in those who are not speaking. “When we begin to limit who can and cannot speak on campus, academia begins to lose its growth” he said. Porter said his concerns in limiting campus speech were largely rooted in silence by exclusion, specifically citing experiences with marginalized communities. “A huge part of this is figuring out whose voices are not being heard,” he added. “Figuring out why those voices aren’t being heard can tell you a lot about a university.” Porter specifically called on Notre Dame for not hosting more speakers from the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi, the Native American tribe who originally claimed the land on which Notre Dame resides.“It is very rare that members of that tribe come here and we need to question why that is so,” he said. John Duffy, a professor from the English department who researches ethics and rhetoric, said he thought the event fostered a good discussion and pushed for students to continue to the conversation even further. “Once we establish that we have the right to invite speakers of diverse views, then as a community we need to decide what kinds of people we want to hear from and what kinds of people we are interested in hearing from,” he said.DaCosta said he hopes to record the third podcast for the “Pod. Country. Notre Dame.” series by the end of the month. Tags: Free speech, Pod. Country. Notre Dame., Podcastlast_img read more

Student-directed one-act plays exploring alternate universes to debut at Philbin Studio Theater

first_imgThe Philbin Studio Theater at DeBartolo Performing Arts Center will run two new student-directed one-act plays, “Coats” by junior Henry Stone and “The Tea on ND” by senior Samuel Jackson II. Both plays debuted Thursday and will show until March.Each of the two plays are set in a flipped world. “Coats” is an absurdist comedy that takes place in a world where empathy is a disease, and “The Tea on ND” explores a parallel universe in which being gay is the norm and straight people are the marginalized minority. Senior Amenabar Farias, director of “The Tea on ND” and senior Patrick Starner, director of “Coats,” said these worlds were fleshed out in a workshopping class they took last semester.“The big thing that we focused on was just trying to figure out what this physical world actually looks like, how the characters interact,” Starner said. “We just messed around with that, and it taught me the world of the play — it’s a very unique piece of theater in this absolutely wonderful world that Henry has crafted.”As director, Starner said he did not come in with a strict plan. Instead, he wanted to collaborate with the actors to create something that felt real. That process, he said, taught him a lot about theater.“I had thoughts and rough guidelines,” Starner said. “But I didn’t want to dictate what all the performers were going to do. We were really able to collaboratively, as a unit, create the show and flush out all these different moments — some of them I didn’t even know were there, and now it’s a great moment in the show.”“The Tea on ND” also explores an alternate universe, and Farias said she hopes people can see the parallels between the play and Notre Dame itself.“It is aimed for the Notre Dame audience,” she said. “We want to make sure that they know that we’re talking about the community they live in. It brings light to all of these issues and raises awareness of these injustices.”Starner, Farias and Jackson have all been involved in plays at Notre Dame before, and Farias said this will be the third play she has directed at the University. She said she was especially excited to work with “The Tea on ND” because it deals with issues and injustices present in the current world.“I’m interested in telling stories that usually go untold,” Farias said. “So when this show was presented to me, I was very interested. It’s not just a show for the sake of being entertaining, because it is entertaining, but it also has a very deep message.”Jackson said he wrote the play in a different universe to shake up the typical view of the University.“It’s an exploration of the University of Notre Dame in a universe where traditions are upended, expectations are unrooted and perspectives drastically change in a hope to shake up the familiar scene and allow audiences to find a new meaning,” he said.While Jackson found inspiration in his own experience at Notre Dame, he said he also wanted it to be accessible for everyone. A large part of that was writing humor into the play alongside the issues it tackles, he said.“It’s fun. It’s a really fun show,” he said. “I have my mission and everything — that whole empathy-building thing, being able to shake up the familiar scene and, you know, analyze the social fabric of this place — that’s great. At the same time, come out and laugh. For two and a half hours, just be with your friends, be with the people on stage and live in the moment. Be challenged, be questioned, allow yourself to see, allow yourself to be seen through the emotions being explored on stage. And laugh.”Tags: Amenabar Farias, coats, Henry Stone, humor, Patrick Starner, Samuel Jackson II, The Philbin Studio Theater, The Tea on NDlast_img read more