Paralyzed referendum

first_imgRegarding the signings, is on the hunt for a central defender, a winger and a center forward. The end is already closed, once the Portuguese was signed in January Trincao. The center forward who likes is Lautaro Martinez , the Argentine of the Inter, who is still confined to Milan, the European epicenter of the pandemic.According Sports world, the last centrals they like are Alessio Romagnoli, of the Milan, Y Dayot Upamecano, of the Leipzig, in addition to other objectives. With all of them, logically, the contact cannot be personal.To all that, it remains unclear that Quique Setién go to be the technician of the next campaign. It will depend on the results of a season of uncertain outcome both on the field and in the offices, waiting for what happens with the competitions in dispute. The Barcelona in a complicated situation similar to what most companies are going through: paralysis of operations for the future, immobility. In a very sensitive moment regarding the planning of the squad for the next course, the executives of the sports area find themselves unable to arrange meetings with agents, clubs or the difficulty of taking planes to make trips to watch games, that in the best of cases they are played behind closed doors, if they have not been suspended.In the same way, the date to call the referendum among the partners to decide if they give the green light to the new financing project for the remodeling of the stadium is paralyzed waiting for what happens with the competition The league.Barça had made it an obligation for this referendum to be held on a match day in the Camp Nou to facilitate partner participation, but the entire planned plan has fallen apart. First, because it is not known when you will be able to play with the public; and, later, because it is feared that all competitions will be suspended.last_img read more

US shifts Cuba policy to allow lawsuits against foreign companies — and

first_imgU.S. shifts Cuba policy to allow lawsuits against foreign companies — and that includes Canadian firms The policy could place Canadian mining, tourism and financial services companies at risk in American courts Related Stories Facebook Comment April 17, 201912:15 PM EDT Filed under News FP Street Contemplating Cuba as the next hot investment destination What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation Mike Blanchfield 5 Comments The Canadian Press More OTTAWA — Canada and the European Union hit back Wednesday at the Trump administration’s decision to allow lawsuits against foreign companies connected to properties seized from American firms during the Cuban revolution, vowing to protect their businesses.Canada and the EU pledged to work together in the World Trade Organization and ban the enforcement or recognition of American court orders against Canadian or European companies.The landmark tightening of the U.S. trade embargo on Cuba’s communist government represents a major shift in U.S. foreign policy — one that could place Canadian mining, tourism and financial services companies at risk in American courts. Trade tensions flare as Trump threatens new EU tariffs on jetliners, helicopters, motorcycles, cheese, wine … The new NAFTA deal is ‘in trouble’ amid looming elections, fights over tariffs ‘I’m not optimistic’: Political will for passage of new NAFTA rapidly evaporating in America About one million Canadians annually vacation in Cuba and Toronto-based resource company Sherritt International is long established there, while countries such as Britain, France and Spain have companies active in rum, cigars and tourism.Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said Canada is “deeply disappointed” and reviewing options with the EU.“The EU and Canada consider the extraterritorial application of unilateral Cuba-related measures contrary to international law,” Freeland, her European Union counterpart Federica Mogherini and EU Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom said in a joint statement Wednesday.“Our respective laws allow any U.S. claims to be followed by counter-claims in European and Canadian courts, so the U.S. decision to allow suits against foreign companies can only lead to an unnecessary spiral of legal actions.”Freeland said the government regularly met with the U.S. officials since January, when the issue first surfaced, to raise concerns about “the possible negative consequences for Canadians — concerns that are long-standing and well known to our U.S. partners.”During a recent trip to Washington, Freeland met with U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to discuss the effect on Canadian companies if the U.S. were to resurrect Title III of the Helms-Burton Act.Canada and its European allies have pushed the Trump administration to continue to suspend use of the dormant section of the law that allows Americans to sue foreign companies linked to Cuban properties confiscated after the 1959 revolution.When the U.S. law came went into force in 1996, then-president Bill Clinton postponed the implementation of Title III. Subsequent presidents followed suit and renewed the exemption every six months.President Donald Trump changed that practice. Last month, the U.S. State Department extended the Title III exemption by only 30 days.Canada’s Foreign Extraterritorial Measures Act was amended in January 1997 to provide that any judgment under the Helms-Burton Act will not be recognized or enforceable in any manner in Canada. Other countries implemented similar ”blocking statutes” at the time.On Wednesday, Pompeo said the end of the Title III exemption is rooted in Cuba’s ongoing support of Nicolas Maduro’s socialist government in Venezuela, and it would take effect early next month.“Cuba’s behaviour in the Western Hemisphere undermines security and stability of countries throughout the region, which directly threatens United States national security interests,” he said, adding that Cuban military intelligence and state security services today keep Maduro in power.“Sadly, Cuba’s most prominent export these days is not cigars or rum, it’s oppression. Detente with the regime has failed.”Canada, its Lima Group allies and the U.S. have called for Maduro’s ouster and recognize opposition leader Juan Guaido as the interim leader of the beleaguered South American country, which has been engulfed in economic and political turmoil, sparking a refugee crisis.The Canadian Chamber of Commerce said recently it was concerned about the potential impact on Canadian companies with operations in Cuba.— with files from Ian Bickis Twittercenter_img ← Previous Next → Email Featured Stories Share this storyU.S. shifts Cuba policy to allow lawsuits against foreign companies — and that includes Canadian firms Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Canada’s Cuba Ventures gets a head start on the coming Cuba tourism boom Reddit The Trump administration says it will now allow lawsuits against foreign companies connected to properties seized from American firms during the Cuban revolution.Ramon Espinosa/AP Photo advertisement Sponsored By: Join the conversation → ‘Political noise’: Canadian miner hopes for business as usual after the Castros’ long rule endslast_img read more