Wood Mackenzie estimates 680GW of new wind power will come online by 2027

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享ReNews:Over 680GW of new wind power capacity will come online in the next 10 years, with the offshore market accounting for nearly 40%, according to a new report from consultancy Wood Mackenzie Power & RenewablesThe ‘Global Wind Power Market Outlook Update: Q4 2018’ report said the overall figure is up 2% on its last forecast in the third quarter update. Wood Mackenzie said most of the upgrades will be in the medium term boosting average annual increases by 2.7GW between 2020 and 2023.Wood Mackenzie director of Americas power & renewables research and lead author of the report Luke Lewandowski said: “With 16GW of offshore wind power capacity installed in Europe by the end of 2018 and more than 47GW expected to come online in the region from 2018 to 2027, the European offshore sector continues to be a focal point of growth for the wind power industry.The report added that favourable announcements from the governments of Japan and South Korea resulted in a more than 1.5GW upgrade quarter-on-quarter (QoQ) on its projections. By the end of the consultancy’s 10-year outlook, the two countries will each have an installed offshore base of more than 2GW.“A significant rate of growth, considering that neither country has more than 100MW of offshore wind power capacity installed today,” Wood Mackenzie said.The company also upgraded its outlook for the US offshore market. “Attractive price signals are expected to motivate an increase in state-level procurement activity from both pioneering states, such as Massachusetts and New York, as well as new entrants over the long-term, such as California and Delaware,” said Lewandowski. The upgrade will increase installed offshore capacity in the US to approximately 10GW by the end of 2027, representing 15% of all new capacity over the 10-year outlook, the report said.More: Offshore helping ‘drive 680GW global wind growth’ Wood Mackenzie estimates 680GW of new wind power will come online by 2027last_img read more

Escape to the Great Smoky Mountains

first_imgEnjoy a two night stay in a King Jacuzzi Suite at the closest boutique hotel to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and the Blue Ridge Parkway. Wake to a sunrise over the Blue Ridge Parkway, enjoy breakfast in your suite or on  your  private balcony/pation and just relax enjoying your whirlpool tub for two, your steam shower for two, a picnic, onsite massage, smores at the campfire by the pond and a walk to our overlook to watch a sunset over Clingmans Dome.Package is valid until Sept. 30 2015 with July, October and Holidays as the blackout dates.The entry deadline for this contest had passed. Check out our other giveaways here. Rules and Regulations: Package must be redeemed within 1 year of winning date. Entries must be received by mail or through the www.blueridgeoutdoors.com contest sign-up page by 12:00 Midnight EST on December 1st, 2014. One entry per person. One winner per household. Sweepstakes open only to legal residents of the 48 contiguous United States and the District of Columbia, who are 18 years of age or older. Void wherever prohibited by law. Families and employees of Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine and participating sponsors are not eligible. No liability is assumed for lost, late, incomplete, inaccurate, non-delivered or misdirected mail, or misdirected e-mail, garbled, mistranscribed, faulty or incomplete telephone transmissions, for technical hardware or software failures of any kind, lost or unavailable network connection, or failed, incomplete or delayed computer transmission or any human error which may occur in the receipt of processing of the entries in this Sweepstakes. By entering the sweepstakes, entrants agree that Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine reserve the right to contact entrants multiple times with special information and offers. Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine reserves the right, at their sole discretion, to disqualify any individual who tampers with the entry process and to cancel, terminate, modify or suspend the Sweepstakes. Winners agree that Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine and participating sponsors, their subsidiaries, affiliates, agents and promotion agencies shall not be liable for injuries or losses of any kind resulting from acceptance of or use of prizes. No substitutions or redemption of cash, or transfer of prize permitted. Any taxes associated with winning any of the prizes detailed below will be paid by the winner. Winners agree to allow sponsors to use their name and pictures for purposes of promotion. Sponsors reserve the right to substitute a prize of equal or greater value. All Federal, State and local laws and regulations apply. Selection of winner will be chosen at random at the Blue Ridge Outdoors office on or before December 1st, 6:00 PM EST 2014. Winners will be contacted by the information they provided in the contest sign-up field and have 7 days to claim their prize before another winner will be picked. Odds of winning will be determined by the total number of eligible entries received.last_img read more

Drug-Smuggling Militiamen Arrested In Colombia

first_imgBy Dialogo September 18, 2009 Twenty-eight suspected members of a paramilitary organization linked to drug trafficking to the United States and Europe were arrested, Colombian authorities said. The arrests were made by Colombian police and prosecutors in coordination with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. One of the most important arrests was made in the Caribbean coastal city of Barranquilla, where Donaldo Verbel Garcia – alias “El Gato” (The Cat), the head of the Los Paisas militia on the northern Colombian coast and the person in charge of coordinating drug shipments abroad – was taken into custody. Police said that El Gato shipped drugs using two methods: across the Caribbean Sea in relatively large boats and with human carriers who first go to Venezuela and from there travel to Central America, the United States and Europe. Authorities also discovered an ingenious strategy the band used to transport drugs on the high seas consisting of securing cargoes of some 500 kilos below the water’s surface attached to a buoy. During the course of the investigation, police also determined that the band has links with other groups like that headed by Daniel Barrera, one of Colombia’s most-wanted drug kingpins. The AUC federation of right-wing militias, which was deeply involved in the drug trade, dissolved in mid-2006 after more than 31,000 paramilitaries laid down their arms in keeping with the peace process agreed to with the government of President Alvaro Uribe. Afterwards, however, other paramilitary bands began cropping up, including Los Paisas, which – in many cases – have developed links with drug trafficking.last_img read more

Colombian Government Gives Green Light For Rebel Hostage Release

first_imgBy Dialogo November 25, 2009 The Colombian government has authorized the International Committee of the Red Cross and the Catholic Church to make “the necessary contacts” with leftist rebels for the release of two soldiers the guerrillas said they are prepared to free unilaterally. That news coincided with rumors that one of the prisoners due to be released, army Cpl. Pablo Emilio Moncayo, had managed to escape from the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC. “The government will provide the necessary guarantees and reiterates its readiness and willingness for this process to be completed as soon as possible,” President Alvaro Uribe’s administration said in a statement announcing the authorizations. FARC commanders said months ago that they were willing to unilaterally free Moncayo and Pvt. Josue Daniel Calvo and deliver the body of police Maj. Julian Ernesto Guevara, who died while in captivity. Until last week, Uribe had been insisting that the rebels hand over all 25 of the soldiers and police they are holding, but the FARC wants to trade 23 of those captives for some 500 jailed guerrillas, a few of whom have been extradited to the United States. The Colombian government has agreed to the FARC’s request that opposition Sen. Piedad Cordoba – instrumental in earlier prisoner releases – join Red Cross and church representatives on the mission to receive the soldiers. Cpl. Moncayo was captured on Dec. 21, 1997, in a rebel attack on the southern town of Cerro Patascoy and is one of the two soldiers who have spent the most time in captivity. His father, teacher Gustavo Moncayo, said Tuesday that a person he declined to identify had told him authorities had indications his son escaped from the insurgents. “Last night I received a call that a guerrilla communication was possibly intercepted in which they say Pablo Emilio escaped,” the elder Moncayo told Caracol Radio. Gustavo Moncayo has become known as the “peace walker” for trekking long distances on foot while wearing chains around his neck to call attention to the plight of his son and the other hostages. Uribe and the FARC accuse each other of having no real interest in negotiations and the president has instead favored rescue operations to free the hostages. One such mission last year, in which Colombian troops disguised as Red Cross workers freed former presidential candidate Ingrid Betancourt, three U.S. military contractors and 11 others, was a resounding success. Yet hostage families say the risks are too great, pointing to the deaths of 11 lawmakers during a clash several years ago between the rebels and army soldiers.last_img read more

Bodyguards Kill Colombian Crime Leader

first_imgBy Dialogo July 29, 2011 The leader of the Colombian criminal gang with the most fighters and one of those most involved in drug-trafficking activities was murdered by his bodyguards in the country’s northwest, the police announced, an event that could lead to the group’s reorganization and spark violence. Emerging criminal gangs are considered the new threat to the security of the country, which has fought drug traffickers and leftist guerillas for decades. Ángel de Jesús Pacheco, alias “Sebastián,” the leader of “Los Rastrojos” [“The Stubble”], died in a rural area of the municipality of Caucacia, in the department of Antioquia. His death could lead to a reorganization of that criminal group, which has around 2,000 members, according to security sources. The police commander in Antioquia, Col. José Gerardo Acevedo, said that the criminal was shot and killed by men he trusted, who then notified the authorities of the crime and the exact location of the corpse. The criminal gangs are made up of former extreme-right-wing paramilitaries who demobilized amid controversial peace negotiations with the government, but who returned to living outside the law, forming private armies in the service of drug traffickers. The intensity of the conflict, as well as the massacres, murders, kidnappings, and attacks on the country’s economic infrastructure, declined after 2002 due to a military offensive launched by former president Álvaro Uribe with support from the United States. Nevertheless, the guerrillas, who withdrew to mountainous and jungle areas, still maintain the capacity to carry out high-impact attacks, even in large urban centers, despite the death of important leaders and desertions by fighters.last_img read more

Chile Triumphs at 2011 International Military Biathlon Championship

first_img After finishing ahead of their peers from Argentina, Brazil, and the United States in five days of arduous competition, the Chilean Army team won the 12th International Military Biathlon Championship, held at the Mountain School (Escuela de Montaña) in the Portillo district. The decisive event was the “mass start,” in which the 25 men and 9 women in the competition began a 15-kilometer cross-country skiing race for men and a 12.5-kilometer race for women at 9:30 a.m., carrying a 22-mm biathlon rifle on their shoulders. The athletes made four stops at a shooting range to fire five shots each time, at targets located at a distance of 50 meters, prone and standing. For each missed shot, they had to ski a penalty loop of 150 meters. At the end of the race, the national team was declared the international champion with 130 points, followed by Argentina with 105 points. Brazil came in third with 45 points. By Dialogo August 22, 2011last_img read more

Brazilian Police Detained 36 People Suspected Of Drug Trafficking To Europe

first_imgBy Dialogo October 31, 2011 The Brazilian police arrested 36 people involved in international drug trafficking on October 27. They had been buying cocaine in Bolivia and marihuana in Paraguay, and the drugs were to be shipped to Europe, according to a statement issued by the Federal Police. “The group was made up of Brazilian, South American and European citizens who brought to Brazil cocaine from Bolivia, and marihuana from Paraguay. The drugs were sent to Europe and Africa”, said the police. During the operation, 80,000 reals were confiscated, (about US$46,800), along with 10 high-end vehicles, and weapons. Thanks to ‘Operation Seed’, which started a year ago, about 70 people had already been arrested under drug trafficking charges, “one of which is suspected of belonging to the Calabrian mafia in Italy”, specified the statement. During this period, the police seized 9,540 pounds of cocaine and 11,490 pounds of marihuana, as well as more than one million reals (about US$585,500), 48 vehicles and an airplane. According to the authorities, the parties involved are facing up to 20 years of prison time.last_img read more

Confirmed Death in Combat of Leader of FARC Front 37

first_imgBy Dialogo June 11, 2012 In a joint operation involving Colombia’s National Army, Navy, and Air Force, the camp structure of FARC Front 37 was successfully located in the municipality of Nechí, in the department of Antioquia. This severe blow to the logistical and financial infrastructure of the “Caribbean Bloc” took place as a consequence of the accurate compilation of intelligence obtained by the National Navy, the precision of the combat and reconnaissance aircraft of the Air Force, and the subsequent operations of the South American country’s National Army. The Technical Investigative Corps of the Public Prosecutor’s Office fully identified Luis Enrique Benítez Cañola, alias “Silvio” or “el Francés” [the Frenchman], the leader of Front 37, and Hernando Tique Rodríguez, alias “Ulises,” the second-ranking leader of Front 35, both of whom died in combat during the operation. As of June 8, the deaths in combat of eight individuals had been confirmed, along with three wounded and the seizure of nine rifles, one pistol, camping equipment, communications, and one ton of provisions. The wounded individuals had been engaging in extortion targeting miners and were part of the security for the leader, alias “Silvio.” The operation, which was conducted early in the morning on June 6, once again neutralized the execution of the “Plan to Retake the Montes de María,” ordered by alias “Iván Márquez” when the redoubts of Fronts 35 and 37 were established in southern Bolívar to restore their finances, carry out forced recruitment, and restore their armed capabilities. With the operations maintained by government forces to prevent the execution of said plan, the leaders of these fronts have been neutralized one by one. WHO HE WAS: “Silvio” was engaged in criminal activity in this narco-terrorist organization for 34 years. He dedicated himself to obtaining resources to support the Caribbean Bloc and its leaders, through extortion targeting miners, retailers, and landholders in the region, the collection of a tax (gramaje) on coca growers, and kidnapping for ransom. He participated in the kidnapping of former minister Fernando Araujo. In 2010, he became the leader of Front 37. Arrest warrants were pending against him for rebellion, kidnapping for ransom, narcotics trafficking, and extortion. The multiple terrorist actions in which he participated include: • The massacre of 13 people in June 2001. • An attack on a Marine convoy that left 12 Military personnel dead and nine wounded. • A terrorist attack on National Police units in June 2003. • In February 2008, he ordered the installation and activation of an improvised explosive device targeting an electrical transmission tower in Tabacalito. • In 2010 and 2011, he was responsible for several attacks on National Army units.last_img read more

Treasury Designates Additional Sinaloa-Based Drug Trafficking Organization

first_imgBy Dialogo January 24, 2013 On January 17, the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced the designation of the Meza Flores Drug Trafficking Organization, including its leader, Fausto Isidro Meza Flores, several key family members, and three companies, all of which help facilitate the operations of the organization. The announcement, pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (Kingpin Act), is the first designation and listing of the Meza Flores narcotics operation as a Drug Trafficking Organization (DTO). This means that anyone providing material support to, or acting for or on behalf of the Meza Flores DTO, can be designated by OFAC in future actions. This designation generally prohibits U.S. persons from engaging in transactions with these eight individuals, three entities, and the entire DTO, and also freezes any assets they may have under U.S. jurisdiction. The Meza Flores DTO operates out of Guasave, Sinaloa, Mexico and since 2000, has been responsible for the distribution of large quantities of methamphetamine, heroin, marijuana, and cocaine to the United States. The Meza Flores DTO is one of the primary rivals to the Sinaloa Cartel in the Mexican state of Sinaloa. As a result of this rivalry, the Meza Flores DTO has engaged in an extremely violent turf war with the Sinaloa Cartel which has resulted in the quadrupling of drug-war killings in the last four years and an increase in kidnappings and arson within the state of Sinaloa. “By targeting the leaders of this extremely violent Sinaloa-based drug trafficking organization we are protecting the U.S. financial system from yet another source of illicit money tied to the narcotics trade,” said OFAC Director Adam J. Szubin. “OFAC will continue to target this organization as well as other Mexican drug trafficking operations that are threatening the United States.” OFAC is designating Fausto Isidro Meza Flores (also known as “Chapito Isidro”), the leader of the Meza Flores DTO for his role in the narcotics trafficking activities of the organization and for playing a significant role in international narcotics trafficking. Fausto Isidro Meza Flores’ wife, Araceli Chan Inzuna; his father, Fausto Isidro Meza Angulo; mother, Angelina Flores Apodaca; sister, Flor Angely Meza Flores; and uncles, Agustin Flores Apodaca, Salome Flores Apodaca, and Panfilo Flores Apodaca were also designated for acting on behalf of Fausto Isidro Meza Flores and the Meza Flores DTO. In July 2012, Agustin Flores Apodaca, was arrested in Mexico for distribution of narcotics and he remains in Mexican custody. Finally, three companies located in Guasave, Sinaloa, that are owned by and acting on behalf of the Meza Flores DTO; a grain transportation company, Autotransportes Terrestres S.A. DE C.V.; a gas and service station, Auto Servicio Jatziry S.A. DE C.V.; and a construction company, Constructora Jatziry De Guasave S.A. DE C.V., were also designated. This action would not have been possible without the support of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Drug Enforcement Administration, U.S. Customs and Border Protection Joint Field Command Arizona, and U.S. State Department Bureau of Diplomatic Security. Internationally, OFAC has designated more than 1,200 businesses and individuals linked to 97 drug kingpins since June 2000. Penalties for violations of the Kingpin Act range from civil penalties of up to $1.075 million per violation to more severe criminal penalties. Criminal penalties for corporate officers may include up to 30 years in prison and fines up to $5 million. Criminal fines for corporations may reach $10 million. Other individuals could face up to 10 years in prison and fines pursuant to Title 18 of the United States Code for criminal violations of the Kingpin Act.last_img read more

Peruvian Armed Forces Deployed to Fight Narco-Violence

first_imgDario Medrano, a spokesman for the DNCD, said an investigation has been launched to capture those associated with the presumed narcotics. Wow these guys are so cool how they fight they seem to be shining along those paths man it’s great to see those Armed Forces from neighboring countries Peru and Bolivia Dario Medrano, a spokesman for the DNCD, said an investigation has been launched to capture those associated with the presumed narcotics. The Dominican Republic’s Military recently teamed with several of the country’s security forces to seize 100 packages of a substance that law enforcement authorities are testing for cocaine and heroin from a ship. Peruvian President Ollanta Humala has deployed the Armed Forces to the Huallaga Valley, a major coca-growing region in the country’s northeast, to combat increased violence by the Shining Path terrorist group. Dominican Military helps seize presumed narcotics The Huallaga Valley, which stretches into the Provinces of Huánuco, San Martín, and Ucayali, is a hotbed for coca plantations that are overseen by the Shining Path, which uses narcotrafficking proceeds to fund its terrorist activities. Coca is the main ingredient used to produce cocaine. Agents with the Center for Information and Joint Coordination (CICC) were checking cargo on the ship’s dock when they noticed one of the container’s seals appeared to have been altered. It was sent to an area where it could undergo a more comprehensive search by security agents in the presence of Deputy Prosecutor Pamela Ramírez. Upon opening the container, law enforcement officers found two bags containing 33 and 34 packages respectively. The packages were sent to a forensic laboratory to be tested and weighed. The Intelligence Department of the Joint Staff of the Armed Forces (J-2), the National Investigations Department (DNI), the Specialized Port Security Corps (CESP) and the Dominican National Directorate for Drug Control (DNCD) also participated in the seizure. Agents with the Center for Information and Joint Coordination (CICC) were checking cargo on the ship’s dock when they noticed one of the container’s seals appeared to have been altered. It was sent to an area where it could undergo a more comprehensive search by security agents in the presence of Deputy Prosecutor Pamela Ramírez. Upon opening the container, law enforcement officers found two bags containing 33 and 34 packages respectively. The packages were sent to a forensic laboratory to be tested and weighed. The increased Military forces were deployed to support the area after the president declared a 60-day state of emergency there on February 20. The decree gives the Armed Forces more power to combat the Shining Path, which works with local narcotrafficking groups and gangs to grow and transport cocaine, according to Humala. The Intelligence Department of the Joint Staff of the Armed Forces (J-2), the National Investigations Department (DNI), the Specialized Port Security Corps (CESP) and the Dominican National Directorate for Drug Control (DNCD) also participated in the seizure. The Huallaga Valley, which stretches into the Provinces of Huánuco, San Martín, and Ucayali, is a hotbed for coca plantations that are overseen by the Shining Path, which uses narcotrafficking proceeds to fund its terrorist activities. Coca is the main ingredient used to produce cocaine. Peruvian President Ollanta Humala has deployed the Armed Forces to the Huallaga Valley, a major coca-growing region in the country’s northeast, to combat increased violence by the Shining Path terrorist group. The increased Military forces were deployed to support the area after the president declared a 60-day state of emergency there on February 20. The decree gives the Armed Forces more power to combat the Shining Path, which works with local narcotrafficking groups and gangs to grow and transport cocaine, according to Humala. By Dialogo February 24, 2015 The Dominican Republic’s Military recently teamed with several of the country’s security forces to seize 100 packages of a substance that law enforcement authorities are testing for cocaine and heroin from a ship. Dominican Military helps seize presumed narcoticslast_img read more