Scarlets team v Ulster – Rees & Jones play

first_imgWales and Scarlets captain, British Lions hooker Matthew Rees back at the helm again as captain said: “We put ourselves in a great position at the beginning of the season, we have played well in our home games – we made a statement and put ourselves in a very good position.“A couple of games recently haven’t gone our way but now we have to concentrate on the remainder of the season. It’s a tough ask to get a result out there, but we have our best team out and we know Ulster will also be looking forward to a Heineken Cup quarter final.“It’s in our hands – we have to win our four remaining games starting with Friday night. We’re in a dog-fight now with the other teams around us. We got the victory against Treviso last weekend, it wasn’t the best of games but we have put things right this week.“The conditions out there are going to be tricky, it will be an arm wrestle early on and we have to take the game to them. It all starts up front and delivering a set-piece for our backline to play off – and we know we’ve got some great players in our backline.”Head Coach Nigel Davies who has told his players it’s ‘Cup Final’ fixture for the Scarlets said: “It’s a big challenge, Ulster are a good side and they have had rowed their luck recently, but all we can do is focus on ourselves. To be honest Sunday wasn’t a bad thing for us, there was so much inaccuracy in our game and it’s given everyone a kick.“We came away with the win know we didn’t do ourselves justice against Treviso and we’ve been very hard on ourselves this week, we’ll have to pick up our levels by at least three notches. The Scarlets travel to Ravenhill on Friday evening for a crucial Magners League fixture against third placed Ulster with just five points separating teams placed two to six.And having been billed as one of the key games of their season, the Scarlets travel to Ulster with a strong 23 boosted with all bar one of their Wales internationals – knowing that only a win will keep them in the top four play-off race.The game comes at the end of a positive week for the Scarlets, with the region announcing that it has signed new contracts with 21 players – a huge commitment to the ongoing development of Welsh talent in the region. The news sees the Scarlets secure the services of a core group of some of Wales’ most promising players that have progressed so well within their region this season.With a number of key internationals all having given their resounding commitment to the future ambitions of the Scarlets, the group travel in positive and focused mood with an impressive backline ready to fire – having fine-tuned their performance after the home win against Treviso on Sunday.The Scarlets narrowly lost out to Ulster in the final minutes of a hotly contested game at Parc y Scarlets in February, and the frustration of that loss (18-16) in the dying seconds is something the Scarlets will be looking to put this right. Ulster have never managed to achieve a season’s double over Scarlets.Scarlets starting XV v Ulster 1/04/2011, Ravenhill kick-off 1905: Rhys Priestland, Gareth Maule, Regan King, Jon Davies, Morgan Stoddart, Stephen Jones, Tavis Knoyle, Iestyn Thomas, Matthew Rees (capt), Rhys Thomas, Lou Reed, Rob McCusker, Josh Turnbull, Johnathan Edwards, Ben Morgan.Replacements: Emyr Phillips, Rhodri Jones, Peter Edwards, Aaron Shingler, David Lyons, Martin Roberts, Daniel Evans, Scott Williams.Wing Sean Lamont (hamstring strain), scrum-half Gareth Davies (dead leg) and wing George North (minor concussion) do not make late fitness tests but back and on the bench comes Wallaby no8 star David Lyons after injury. “We need to secure our own possession and then we have a game we can build. The contact area is always important against the Irish sides and our turnover rate has to be low because of our intent to play. It’s great to play an open and expansive style of rugby but we’re expecting our backs to be equally efficient in the contact areas as our forwards in order to get anything out of Friday’s game.”Ulster along with Munster are the form teams in the League, both having gained 22 league points from their last six matches. The Ulstermen have won their last five Magners League matches. The Scarlets are on 50 points and sit in sixth with Ulster on 55 points in third position. The Scarlets have won 10 games, drawn one and lost seven in the Magners League this season. They have four games left to play against Ulster away, Munster at home on 16th April, Glasgow away and then Cardiff Blues at home on 6th May.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Rugby Rant: It’s time to revive the drop-goal

first_imgThe Wilko way: Jonny was renowned for pulling off drop-goals under pressure LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS By Gary WattonIT’S TEN years since Jonny Wilkinson helped net rugby’s greatest prize courtesy of a dramatic drop-goal. And it’s four years since the now retired Ronan O’Gara dropped a goal in the dying minutes in Cardiff to secure Ireland’s first Grand Slam in 61 years.Just two examples of when drop-goals proved critical. So why has there been a sharp decline in the use of such a weapon?Were it not for Dan Biggar’s last-day three-pointer against England, there would have been only one match in this year’s Six Nations which contained a drop-goal: Italy’s defeat of France.The evidence indicates that fly-halves only go for a drop-goal when a penalty has been awarded and a referee is playing advantage, so the drop-goal is the equivalent of cricket’s free hit.Clearly the introduction of the five-point try in the early 1990s has struck a blow to the art of dropping goals. Teams venturing deep into enemy territory have had to decide whether to have a pop at the drop, or chisel away at the defence and run the risk of a turnover, knock-on or ruck infringement.And the stats tell us that sides prefer to gamble on the greater prize of seven points for a converted try.It’s a winner: Bernard Foley’s drop-goal put Australia back in front in Cardiff in 2014Over the past two Six Nations tournaments, only five games out of 30 have yielded drop-goals. This contrasts with the heyday of such ammo in the 1980s, when 56 of the decade’s 100 Five Nations skirmishes saw at least one successful drop-goal. This 56% volume slipped to a mere 31 out of 100 championship Tests in the 1990s. And the infant Six Nations that followed saw drop-goals in only 45 of its first 150 contests, a meagre 30% of the matches.Such a trend is visible too with the Lions: in their 15 Tests dating back to 1993, there have been a paltry three drop-goals – compared to 17 in the previous 23 contests.Yet given that defences are proving tougher to crack and sustained attacks less effective, many teams have cause to question the wisdom of not bagging some reward for their pressure.The drop-goal’s decline is a matter of regret to purists who appreciate the skill and teamwork in an attacking foray that culminates in an accurate drop-goal attempt. Is it time to increase its value to four points, in order to persuade fly-halves that the occasional drop-goal represents good value?I for one believe it is. Check out Ronan O’Gara’s Six Nations Grand Slam-winning drop-goal below This was published in the July 2013 edition of Rugby World. Click here to see what’s in the current issue.last_img read more

Six Nations: Team of the tournament

first_img TAGS: Highlight Any Six Nations team is bound to be contentious, so with the hide of a rhino, I’ve picked the best team in the tournament. So without further ado, here it is, please let us know who’d be in your side…15. Stuart Hogg (Sco)Stuart Hogg has been mesmerising in this tournament. In a struggling side he has made the most metres (442), tops defenders beaten (18) and is second in carries (63). His cover tackle on Mike Brown and jet-heeled try down the flank against Wales were highlights. Leigh Halfpenny was also outstanding.Fire in the belly: Stuart Hogg has shone in a struggling Scotland team (Pic Inpho)14. Yoann Huget (Fra)Huget played in every minute of the Six Nations and has been one of the few positives for France. At 6ft 3in and nearly 16st he can play the power game, but has touches of panache that mark him out as a gifted back three runner.13. Jonathan Joseph (Eng)An afterthought who only came into the full England squad in the wake of Manu Tuilagi’s injury, Joseph has played on instinct, innate talent and bravery. Four tries and an army of admirers won, he’s already being touted as a potential star of the World Cup.12. Jamie Roberts (Wal)He’s been unfairly bracketed as a route one merchant but you would look no further for your defensive captain. Roberts’ spot tackle on Remi Tales in Paris and Tommy Bowe in Cardiff were game-savers and he powered over for a try against the Azzurri. Robbie Henshaw had an highly-assured opening tournament.Super-strength: Jamie Roberts is the glue in the Wales midfield and a top-class defender (Pic Inpho)11. George North (Wal)Until the final game, North was out of the running for this list; try-less, concussed against England, it appeared nothing was falling for the big North Walian but nine second-half minutes in Rome set him out as the premier strike runner in European rugby. Twenty-two Test tries at just 22 speaks for itself.10. George Ford (Eng)Tender in years, he turned 22 during the tournament, Ford has beaten the more esteemed Johnny Sexton, and flawless Dan Biggar by dint of his ability to create; England scored 18 tries, Ford scoring two of them, and he was an architect in many. Throw in a 75-point tournament haul and a doff of the cap is fully warranted.The kid can play: George Ford racked up 75 points in a fine tournament (Pic Inpho)9. Conor Murray (Ire)One of the most improved players in the Northern Hemisphere in the last 18 months, Murray is an arch exponent of the box-kick – note his delicious dink over the top of the English defence for Robbie Henshaw – and his quick delivery, sound decision making and intuitive understanding with Sexton sees him as one of the pre-eminent No 9s in world rugby.8. Sergio Parisse (Ita)Would Italy miss him again Wales? Not for 40 minutes they didn’t, but then the gladiatorial wheels came off the Azzurri chariot in Rome spectacularly when Parisse’s leadership and brilliance were so badly needed. A thoroughbred surrounded by cart-horses, his elation after the win against Scotland told of a man who loves his country dearly.Superman: Parisse can do just about anything; pass, kick, carry, offload (Pic Inpho)7. Sam Warburton (Wal)It’s the first time in five tournaments he’s played in every game, and Warburton has played with ferocity, finesse and fearlessness. After 24 tackles against Ireland he excelled against Italy, scoring a fine individual effort. A slow starter as he regained fitness, Sean O’Brien was galloping by the time he faced Scotland. 6. Peter O’Mahony (Ire)O’Mahony brings some old-fashioned ‘dog’ to the back row. He is distinctly unpleasant to play against, a nuisance at the breakdown and an underrated ball carrier. Munsterman O’Mahony has an incredible workrate that bears comparison with Richard Hill.5. Alun Wyn Jones (Wal)Alun Wyn Jones has been a model of excellence in this year’s tournament. A ferocious competitor all over the park, a gifted lineout technician and cerebral leader, there is no argument top Jones is one of the premier locks in world rugby.Leader of men: Alun Wyn Jones has been inspiration in this year’s tournament (Pic Inpho)4. Paul O’Connell (Ire)Cut from the same cloth as Jones, O’Connell passed the 100-cap milestone with the same searing intensity he started the first, 13 years ago. Widely thought to be his final Six Nations, O’Connell even dotted down against Italy. How Ireland will miss him.3. Dan Cole (Eng)There were rumours Cole’s place was under threat after his long-term injury and Davey Wilson’s ability in the No 3 shirt, but Cole’s tournament has only affirmed him as one of the most complete tight-heads in the game. Cole puts in tackles, hit rucks and makes turnovers for the full 80. Before injury, Samson Lee was pushing him hard.2. Guilhem Guirado (Fra)Not a position where one individual stood above the rest but for sheer audacity in his delightful cat-flap offload to Maxime Mermoz, Guilhem Guirado deserves the shirt. Toulon’s No 2 possesses a wide skill-set, he rampages around in the loose, has soft hands and hits his jumpers. A priceless commodity.All-round game: Guirado impressed with his offloading ability1. Joe Marler (Eng)Seen to be keeping the shirt warm for the injury-prone Alex Corbisiero, Marler has grown into the England jersey and is now one of Stuart Lancaster’s go-to men. An improving scrummager, he is a whirling-dervish in the loose and a growing leader within the England camp.Replacements bench: After a scintillating final weekend of tournament rugby, it’s time to take stock, douse ourselves down and pick the finest players of the Six Nations LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 16. Scott Baldwin (Wal)Replaced Richard Hibbard and fully justified his inclusion. A rock against Ireland17. Samson Lee (Wal)The fear that dogged Wales for years when Adam Jones was injured has now been replaced by panic for Lee’s injured Achilles18. Cian Healy (Ire)Injured at the start of the tournament but back to his bullocking best against Scotland19. Jonny Gray (Sco)Handed the captaincy for the last half-an-hour against Ireland, Gray is only 21 but being talked up as a future Lion.Don’t stop me know: Sean O’Brien is a power-packed operator (Pic Inpho)20. Sean O’Brien (Ire)Another to start the championship needing game time, O’Brien was unstoppable against Scotland. Indispensible to the green machine21. Rhys Webb (Wal)Webb scored three tries, set up countless others and has had a stellar tournament. Needs watching like a hawk around the ruck22. Dan Biggar (Wal)Growing in influence, Biggar is a fine exponent of the kick and catch, a brave defender and vocal organiser of men23. Jack Nowell (Eng)Able to cover at wing or full-back, Nowell is assured under the high-ball, a sound defender and has a lower error-count A man apart: Paul O’Connell has led Ireland to first back-to-back title since 1949 (Pic Inpho) last_img read more

Hotshots: Bristol prop Ellis Genge

first_img On the charge: Ellis Genge in action for England U20s. (Photo: Getty Images) Tell us about your rugby background…I started when I was about nine, at Old Redcliffians. I had played football until then. Once I  was about 12 rugby became my priority.When did you become a prop?I played No 8 until I was 16, and No 13 a bit. Ian Peel (England age-groups coach) first told me to move to the front row when I was 15 and I finally did just before the England U18 tour to South Africa in 2013.Are you glad you heeded his advice?I didn’t want to move but I am starting to enjoy it and Ian Peel is quite smug about it! I am 20kg heavier now. That took a lot of eating!Who else has had a big influence on you?My dad, Richard. He is quite negative and used to say ‘you will never play for England’ but now I realise it’s because it made me work harder. He likes a beer on a Sunday so was happy to take me to matches!When did you join Bristol?When I was 17. I went on loan to Clifton in 2013-14 and had a year in National Two, which meant I came on in leaps and bounds scrum-wise. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Date of birth: 16 Feb 1995. Country: England.center_img When did you first play for England?I played U18s and U19s twice, and this is my first season with the U20s. I would love to go to this year’s Junior World Cup and play some rugby in the sunshine in Italy!What do you do outside rugby?I’m doing courses in how to start your own business and I’m mentoring younger boys with Impact Mentoring – boys who had the same problems as me growing up and are gettinginto trouble. I got arrested a few times before I was 16 but I am definitely a different bloke now. RW verdict: Genge showed his worth in England’s U20 wins over Italy and Ireland before injury ruled him out briefly in March. At 6ft 1in and 18st 8lb, this determined andresolute youngster has a bright future.last_img read more

Hotshot: Saracens fly-half Max Malins

first_img When did you start playing rugby?Aged six or seven, at the Saffron Walden club. But I soon moved on to Bishop’s Stortford and I was there until U17s.How did you get spotted by Sarries?Matt Davies from the club saw me in a school game for Felsted, and I joined their junior academy at 17. I’m now in my first year in the senior academy. England U20 are looking at me as a ten, whereas Saracens are keeping their options open, as a ten, 12 or 15.Are you studying?Yes. I’m doing a business and finance degree at Herts University I hope to have a long career in rugby but I’m building something for afterwards.Who’ve been your biggest coaching influences?Andrew Le Chevalier at Felsted really backed me, and Ian Vass, my mentor at Sarries – he’d try to get to my school every week to work on my kicking and skills. And my dad. RW Verdict: A sparkling, creative player, Malins has been on loan at Old Albanians this term (2015-16) – scoring four tries v Clifton – and getting game time with Saracens A.First published in the March 2016 edition of Rugby World magazine. TAGS: Saracens LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Happy days: Max Malins (centre) celebrates scoring a try for England U20. (Photo: Getty Images) We hear you kicked at Twickenham last autumn…Yes, myself and London Irish’s Theo Brophy-Clews went on the pitch at half-time during England v Ireland. We kicked the ball to each other and took a couple of goal kicks.Did you gain a lot from it?It was amazing, with the guy on the mike getting the crowd cheering and out heart rates being shown on the big screen! Mine was so high, about 140! It was all about getting us used to kicking under pressure. We went up on the Friday and saw England train and had our kicking biomechanically assessed at St Mary’s College. Date of birth: 9 January 1997. Country: Englandlast_img read more

Summer tours: France see a chink of light against Argentina

first_imgThe French pack also won the breakdown battle, slowing up Argentine possession and defending around the fringes with a ferocity that unsettled the Pumas. True, a tired, indisciplined Argentina were a shadow of the side that reached the World Cup semi-final last season, but they were out-muscled upfront and in their second Test their backs rarely got the ball to test the tourists outwide.3. Back-rowThe French front-five will be a test for anyone next season but the weakness in the pack remains the back-row, particularly on the flank. Louis Picamoles at No 8 is top-class, and the move to Northampton will sharpen his fitness and make him even more of a threat from the base of the scrum. Come together: France rallied after a First Test less to run out convincing winners Trinh-Duc has left Montpellier for Toulon and it may be that coming under the tutelage of Diego Dominguez will iron out the flaws in his game; but with Trinh-Duc the flaws are more mental than anything. Failing that, there’s always Clermont’s Camille Lopez. But France’s fly-half cupboard continues to be worryingly bare.5. Gael FickouFickou won his first cap for France a fortnight before he turned 19 and in the three years since he’s had his ups and downs in the Test arena. For a time he was moved to the wing, by both the then France coach Philippe Saint-Andre and his Toulouse boss Guy Noves.Classy operator: Gael Fickou is maturing into a fine No 13 The predictions of doom and gloom were premature. Far from a Tour of Hell, France’s two-Test series in Argentina ended all-square and offers Les Bleus some hope for next season. RW runs an eye over France’s form against the Pumas…1. New FacesDeprived of several of his leading players because of the Top 14 semi-finals, coach Guy Noves took a raw 28-man squad to Argentina and seven new caps were selected for the first Test against the Pumas. Three stood out in particular: 21-year-old scrum-half Baptiste Serin, second-row Julien Ledevedec and hooker Remi Bonfils.Experimenting: Guy Noves introduced a number of new faces to the France squad Bare cheek: Louis Picamoles loses his shorts but is a class actBut none of Raphaël Lakafia, Loann Goujon or Kevin Gourdon made much of an impact against Argentina. The trio are Top 14 flankers – big, bruising men but without the athletic, creative dynamism required at international level. In last season’s Six Nations Guy Noves went through Damien Chouly, Wenceslas Lauret, Yacouba Camara, Antoine Burban and Bernard Le Roux in his search for quality flankers but the hunt will continue next season.4. Fly-halfThe stage was set for Jules Plisson in the first Test. The Stade Francais fly-half was named captain but he failed to rise to the occasion as the Pumas ran out 30-19 winners. Noves dropped Plisson for the second Test, replacing him with Francois Trinh-Duc, but the veteran fly-half produced the sort of mediocre inconsistency that has characterised his eight-year international career.Mixed bag: Francois Trinh-Duc’s performance was inconsistentcenter_img Rumours of France’s demise have been premature, after levelling the Series against Argentina, we assess reasons for hope in the Les Bleus camp Selected again for the second Test, the trio made the step up from club to Test rugby look easy, and while France are already well served at scrum-half and hooker, the emergence of Ledevedec (at 30 a late bloomer) will offer Noves more options next season in a position where France have few quality players.2. ScrumTogether with veteran lock Yoann Maestri, Ledevedec dominated the line-out battle in the 27-0 thrashing of the Pumas in the second Test, losing just one of their 12 throws and pinching five of their hosts’. It was a similar story in the first Test as the French pack bossed the scrum and line-out.Power up front: Jefferson Poirot was part of an improved scrum effort from France Fortunately Noves, now he’s coaching Les Bleus, understands that Fickou’s best position is at 13, as he showed in his strong showing in the second Test against Argentina. Still only 22, Fickou is maturing physically as well as emotionally, and his vision, strength and deceptive speed will be a potent weapon for France next season.last_img read more

Hotshot: Leicester full-back Freddie Steward

first_img Leicester’s Freddie Steward breaks against Ulster (Getty Images) Leicester full-back Freddie Steward Date of birth 5 December 2000 Born Norwich Position Full-back Club Leicester Tigers Country EnglandHow old were you when you first played? Five. Mum and Dad took me down to my local club, Swaffham. My older brother already played there, so before then I’d go down to watch and throw a ball around on the touchline.Did you play any other sports? A lot. I played county cricket for a few years and a lot of hockey. It wasn’t until I was 13 or 14 that the rugby got more serious.Is that when you linked up with Leicester… Yes, at the local DPP (Developing Player Programme) centre in Norfolk. I had a few years there, then I was fortunate to get a place in the academy at U17-18 and I pushed on from there.Have you always been a full-back? I started at fly-half, then inside-centre. Then at 15 I moved to full-back; the academy coaches thought it would be a good idea to see how I went there.I love being behind the front line – lots of talking and bossing people around! I like the aerial contests and high balls. And I love the kicking battles too.How have you found the Premiership?  It’s been a massive step up but I’ve been introduced slowly, which is really good. It’s not like I was thrown in at the deep end. I’ve built experience gradually. The physicality is the biggest difference – big blokes!Who was your childhood hero? I used to watch Leicester a lot when I was younger and I looked up to Matt Smith, who is now an attack coach here, as a player. Also Geordie Murphy, one of the best full-backs to ever play the game.Who has been the biggest influence on your career? My mum and dad. They’ve spent countless hours watching me play and driving me around the country.What are your long-term goals? At the minute to stay consistent. I want to play in the Premiership for a long time, not be someone who started at 19 then dropped off and never played again. So to be consistent, in and around the starting XV.What do you do away from rugby? I’m studying for a degree in economics at Loughborough. It’s been tough to balance that with rugby but if I didn’t have that I’d just get bored all the time! I’m in my second year and will probably split my final year over two years.RW Verdict: Steward, who has played for England U18 and U20, has become a regular in the Tigers No 15 shirt since rugby resumed last August. Safe under the high ball and dynamic in attack, he is poised for a long career. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img A standout for the Tigers in 2020-21, particularly under the high ball, the back talks through his rugby journey This article originally appeared in the May 2021 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Through Grace, parolees and parishioners build relationship

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ By ENS staffPosted Mar 5, 2012 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Submit an Event Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Director of Music Morristown, NJ center_img An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Through Grace, parolees and parishioners build relationship Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Shreveport, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Through the Ohio Adult Parole Authority, parolees work on the grounds and facilities of Grace, College Hill, as part of a community services program.[Episcopal News Service] For more than five years, parolees have gone each month to Grace Church, College Hill, a community in Cincinnati (Diocese of Southern Ohio) for a half day to do grounds and maintenance work.Part of a community service program through the Ohio Adult Parole Authority, it is a mutually beneficial arrangement: the parolees get community service credit and Grace Church gets some badly needed work done. But, for all parties involved, this program has turned out to mean much more than a simple exchange.“We heard about this program at a meeting of the College Hill Summit, a meeting of neighborhood leaders,” says parishioner Mary McLain. “The Citizens on Patrol explained that this would be an opportunity to help people come back into the community as good citizens. They explained that the parolees are mostly sex offenders. Not many organizations can or are willing to work with them, but Grace said, ‘Sure, we can do that!’”The paroleees started with clearing brush, litter control, grass cutting, and planting flowers and bushes donated by parishioners. When winter came, the work moved inside.“Junk got moved and stored; rooms were cleared and painted,” McLain said.From the beginning, after the morning’s work was finished, parishioners provided the workers with a hot meal. “The guys (mostly guys) were especially appreciative of the meal,” said McLain. “Their appreciation was nice, but we thought nothing more of it until the parole officer explained that for many of them, this was the only hot, home-cooked meal they had all month.”The parish began to build relationships with the workers.“We cooked more food,” McLain said. “We made sure they could take leftovers with them. We sat and ate together and learned their names. The food provided a common topic of conversation, of what our mothers and grandmothers made for us. They talked of the meals they were able to concoct from canteen offerings and share on the inside. They began to lead the prayers before the meal.”Parishioners soon learned what chores the parolees did and did not like to do, finding that they were particularly proud of seeing flowers they had planted come up the next year. One worker took photos to show off to his friends.“When we needed a Sunday school room painted before the program year began, they worked liked beavers to get it done and wanted to know how the kids liked it,” said McLain. “They have stayed beyond their three hours to finish cutting the grass.”Unexpected talents emerged, she said; one worker fixed the hinges on a donated piano, repaired a faulty valve on the boiler, and built a new base for a water-damaged cabinet.“We are a small church so their contribution of labor means a lot to us,” said McLain. “They help us, and we try to help them. What a ministry!” Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 last_img read more

Episcopales reafirman su compromiso con el medioambiente

first_img Episcopales de la Diócesis de California reunidos debajo de un árbol en Lone Tree Point junto a la costa de East Bay, in Rodeo, California, al nordeste de San Francisco, para la EcoConfirmación del 23 de abril, en la cual los participantes reafirmaron su compromiso con el medioambiente. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS[Episcopal News Service – Rodeo, California] Tres palabras, tres palabras adicionales, es todo lo que lleva expandir el modo en que los episcopales son llamados a vivir su fe para incluir el cuidado de la Tierra.En la Diócesis Episcopal de California, la quinta y última pregunta del Pacto Bautismal que sigue al Credo de los Apóstoles, dice: ¿Lucharás por la justicia y por la paz entre todos los pueblos y respetarás la dignidad de la Tierra y de todo ser humano?”, La palabra clave, por supuesto, es “Tierra”.“Durante casi todo el tiempo que el obispo ha estado aquí, él nos ha estado recordando en la mayoría de los bautizos y confirmaciones que estamos comprometidos a la reconciliación con Dios, los unos con los otros y con la Tierra”, dijo la Rda. Julia McCray-Goldsmith, canóniga de la diócesis para el discipulado. “Parte de eso es su profundo compromiso con una sana mayordomía de la Tierra; y yo diría con la integridad de nuestra naturaleza encarnada, con nosotros mismos como seres físicos que realmente no pueden separarse de las ecologías humana y natural en que habitamos”.El sábado 23 de abril, al día siguiente del Día de la Tierra, que este año se destacó por la histórica firma del Acuerdo de París —el primer acuerdo internacional del clima que busca reducir la emisión de gases de efecto invernadero y limitar el calentamiento global a menos de 2 grados Celsius—, la Diócesis de California llevó a cabo su tercera EcoConfirmación anual. 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Susan Champion, rectora de la iglesia episcopal de Cristo el Señor, en Pinole, conduce a más de 25 participantes en la EcoConfirmación del 23 de abril en un recorrido hasta la mesa de la comunión, en que se detienen a orar en tres puntos a lo largo del trayecto donde la belleza y la degradación se encuentran. Ella y su esposo, el Rdo. Peter Champion, viven en Rodeo. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENSEl patético sitio —teniendo presente la firma del acuerdo del clima y su énfasis en reducir la dependencia de los combustibles fósiles— lo sugirió la Rda. Susan Champion, rectora de la iglesia episcopal de Cristo el Señor [Christ the Lord Episcopal Church] en el barrio de Pinole, quien vive en Rodeo con su esposo, el Rdo. Peter Champion, y es maestra sustituta en el sistema público de la localidad.Al proponer el sitio, Champion preguntó: ¿Qué pasa si la celebramos [la EcoConfirmación] en un lugar que nos recuerde la degradación humana del medioambiente?”La refinería Phillips 66 es una de las cinco de la zona de la bahía de San Francisco: cuatro de ellas están localizadas en el condado de Costa. Procesa 120.000 barriles diarios. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENSLa refinería Phillips 66 es enorme, y una de las cinco de la zona de la bahía de San Francisco; ha sido objeto de repetidas advertencias por violar las normas de la calidad del aire del estado y está considerada como el séptimo agente contaminador más tóxico de California. No sólo la refinería es gigantesca, sino que está cerca de un proyecto de viviendas público y un programa de aceleración infantil [Head Start]. Muchos residentes, dijo Champion, padecen de asma y de otras enfermedades relacionadas con la calidad del aire.Rodeo es un municipio no constituido, añadió, y por tanto carece de un concejo municipal, sus residentes están representados por un solo hombre en la Junta de Supervisores del condado de Costa. Los medio de prensa locales no incluyen esta refinería, y fue mediante un informe de un cable de la Dow Jones News que publicó el Wall Street Journal a principios de este año que los residentes se enteraron que el malfuncionamiento de un equipo ha causado la liberación de 500 libras de dióxido sulfúrico de la refinería de 120.000 barriles diarios.El oficio comenzó con la Caminata Cósmica, una meditación sobre la historia de la creación a partir del Big Bang hace 14.000 millones de años y la formación de la atmósfera de la Tierra, el surgimiento del homo sapiens, la escritura de la Biblia y el nacimiento de Jesús hasta el descubrimiento del oro en California en 1848 y el petróleo convirtiéndose en una importante industria del estado a principios del siglo XX hasta 1969 cuando los humanos vieron por primera vez la Tierra desde el espacio.Luego, ¿cómo puede la EcoConfirmación recordarles a los episcopales el impacto que los humanos están teniendo en el planeta? “Creo que el uso de la Caminata Cósmica, al recordarnos nuestra profunda interrelación, es importante”, dijo Andrus después del oficio.Miriam MacGillis, de Genesis Farms de Nueva Jersey, creó la Caminata Cósmica como un medio de llevar los 14.000 millones de años de la historia de la Tierra de algo que los humanos saben en sus cabezas a algo que sepan con el corazón. Andrus y su esposa, Shelia, la trajeron a la Diócesis de California poco después de su consagración como obispo hace 10 años.Como Andrus mencionó durante el oficio, el mundo se encuentra en la llamada Era Antropocénica, o la era en que la influencia humana está teniendo un impacto significativo en la geología y los ecosistemas de la Tierra. Reducir conscientemente la influencia humana exigirá un cambio en la manera de pensar de los humanos respecto a cómo se relacionan unos con otros y con los ecosistemas y las economías de que forman parte.“El cambio que tenemos que hacer en este punto es el cambio de ser un mundo donde hay algunos sujetos como los humanos y luego hay muchos objetos, y eso incluiría a los humanos utilizados para el trabajo y la trata [de personas]… donde los humanos se usan como herramientas”, dijo él, luego del oficio. “Básicamente , toda la Tierra ha sido objetivada y ese es un proceso que ha estado pasando en Occidente durante unos 400 años.“De manera que lo que queremos hacer es esforzarnos por salir de eso y entrar en un universo de sujetos. Este es una manera muy inteligible de entender nuestras interrelaciones no sólo de unos con otros, sino con la Tierra y con toda la vida en la Tierra”.Andrus predicó su homilía, confirmó a un hombre y recibió a otro en la Iglesia Episcopal, y la mayoría de las restantes 25 personas se comprometieron nuevamente con Cristo y renovaron el Pacto Bautismal. Luego, Champion condujo al grupo en un recorrido a la mesa de la comunión, deteniéndose para orar en tres puntos, a lo largo del trayecto, donde se encuentran la belleza y la degradación [del medioambiente].En el primer alto, los participantes miraron a la bahía y reconocieron que durante 150 años la gente ha permitido que las sustancias contaminantes entren en sus aguas; en el segundo alto reflexionaron sobre las vías del ferrocarril que han transportado petróleo crudo en vagones mal equipados cuando los precios estaban altos, amenazando la seguridad de los residentes; y finalmente, en lo alto de una cuesta desde donde contemplaron la refinería, la más sucia de California.“Este pedazo de tierra, la primera vez que lo vi me partió el corazón”, dijo McCray-Goldsmith, añadiendo que la tierra misma es como las estaciones de la bendición y el pesar. “Esta tierra es una especie de ventana sacramental, un signo externo y visible y una gracia interna y espiritual que incluye la gracia de las lágrimas, la gracia de la pena por el daño que le hemos hecho a la Tierra… según hemos salido a visitar diversos sitios, esos sitios se han convertido siempre en sacramentos”.– Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska La Rda. Este Cantor, vicaria de la iglesia episcopal del Buen Pastor, en Berkeley, California, conduce a un asistente regular (detrás de ella) en la Caminata Cósmica para ser recibido en la Iglesia Episcopal durante la ceremonia de EcoConfirmación en Lone Tree Point, Rodeo. El perro del hombre lo sigue en el círculo donde fue recibido por el obispo Marc Andrus. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENSDurante la EcoConfirmación, los participantes reafirman sus promesas bautismales de “amar las maravillosas obras de Dios, y proteger la belleza e integridad de toda la creación”. Como comunidad, se vuelve a comprometer con la Quinta Marca de la Misión la cual postula “luchar por salvaguardar la integridad de la creación y sostener y renovar la vida en la Tierra”.Durante su homilía, el obispo de California Marc Andrus, que representó al obispo primado Michael Curry y a la Iglesia Episcopal en la ceremonia de la firma del acuerdo del clima en la sede de las Naciones Unidas en Nueva York el 22 de abril, reflexionó sobre el significado del día anterior.“A la Iglesia Episcopal y a todo el mundo cristiano, ciertamente a todo el mundo de la fe, se le ofrece esta oportunidad de respaldar a toda la Tierra y la restauración de lo que ha llegado a ser la muy enferma Madre Tierra”, dijo. “Y esta pequeña Tierra, tan frágil, tan hecha a mano en todo sentido y sin embargo tan increíblemente bella para mí, es una semilla que puede ser tan poderosa como la simiente que empezó todo esto. ¿Por qué? Porque es Dios quien comienza a desarrollar la semilla. Es Dios el que da el crecimiento. Dios quien hace la semilla. Dios quien nos bendice con este día”.El Acuerdo de París llama a todas las naciones del mundo a limitar las emisiones de carbono, lo cual exigirá una transición de los combustibles fósiles a fuentes más renovables para responder a sus necesidades energéticas. En su tercera encarnación, en lugar de tener lugar en un lugar de intacta belleza natural, como un centro de retiro en el Condado de Sonoma o en la bahía de la Media Luna, el oficio al aire libre tuvo lugar en Lone Tree Point, a la sombra de una refinería de petróleo en Rodeo, una diversa comunidad de clase obrera en East Bay, a unos 40 kilómetros al nordeste de San Francisco. Rector Shreveport, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL Episcopales reafirman su compromiso con el medioambiente La Diócesis de California celebra su tercera EcoConfirmación anual Rector Knoxville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Tagslast_img read more

New study explores growth and decline in the Anglican Communion

first_img Rector Smithfield, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Events Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem [Anglican Communion News Service] A new academic study into growth and decline in the Anglican Communion will be marked by a day conference and the publication of a new book. Edited by the Rev. Dr. David Goodhew, director of ministerial practice at Cranmer Hall, part of St John’s College at Durham University, Growth and Decline in the Anglican Communion – 1980 to the Present, is described by publishers Routledge as “the first study of [the Anglican Communion’s] dramatic growth and decline in the years since 1980.”Full article. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA By Gavin DrakePosted Nov 15, 2016 Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Job Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New study explores growth and decline in the Anglican Communion Rector Martinsville, VA Anglican Communion Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ last_img read more