Sacred lake to be heritage site

first_imgThe enchanting Drakensberg Mountains are deemed to have a spiritual impact on visitors. (Image: Wikimedia) The sacred Lake Fundudzi captured from a distance. (Image: South African Tourism) One of the many waterfalls in the Hogsback  valley. (Image: Tusafiri)Khanyi Magubane The sacred Lake Fundudzi situated in the mountainous area of Tshiavha village, north of South Africa, will soon be declared a national heritage site.The Limpopo Department of Arts and Culture has confirmed that processes to declare the enigmatic freshwater lake are at an advanced stage.Spokesperson for the department says the South African Heritage Resource Agency (SAHRA) is yet to decide on an official date for the declaration.SAHRA is a statutory organisation established under the National Heritage Resources Act of 1999, as the national administrative body responsible for the protection of South Africa’s cultural heritage.The great powers of Lake Fundudzi have been kept a closely guarded secret by the Vhavenda people, who have preserved it for generations.The lake is often associated with myth and legends of the Vhavenda people and is believed to be protected by a python god, who has to be pacified annually with gifts of traditionally brewed beer.As the legend goes, a Venda man, with a broken heart after losing a great love, in his sorrow walked into Lake Fundudzi and turned into a python.Outsiders are not permitted to visit the lake. Currently, only those granted special permission by the Netshiava royal family, can visit the lake.In Venda culture, the python is the god of fertility and maidens still perform the famous Domba-python dance in the sacred lake to honour this god.The young women form a line in which they hold on to the elbows of the maiden in front of them, and using their joint arms, make snake-like movements next to the lake to honour the god.Other myths around the lake include a story of mysterious “zombies” which live near at the lake and play the traditional Venda music known as Tshikona.The lake is surrounded by the Thathe Vondo forest, deemed to be so mystical and filled with spirits that few Venda people venture into it for fear of alleged hauntings and a lightning bird called “Ndadzi”.It’s believed that on the rare occasion that a visit to the lake is granted, visitors must turn their backs on the lake and view the water from between their legs.This ritual is called “Fundudzi” after which the lake is named.Visitors travelling to the Limpopo are able to get a glimpse of the lake, from above, when travelling along the surrounding mountains.The naming of Lake Fundudzi as a heritage site comes at a time when South Africa is celebrating heritage month, with 24 September marked as a public holiday to celebrate Heritage Day.Sacred South AfricaThere are a number of sites in South Africa that are considered to be sacred.The fertility caves in the eastern Free State, for instance, have served as a spiritual gathering place of prayer for over 800 years to various tribes and religions in and around southern Africa.Hogsback in the Eastern Cape is also regarded as a place of spiritual upliftment. Situated in the Amatola Mountains, it’s surrounded by large tracts of indigenous forest, and waterfalls with names such as Madonna and Child, and the Bridal Veil Cataract, Swallowtail and Kettlespout.In the Limpopo province, the forest of the rain queen, Modjadi, is highly regarded as a place of deep spirituality.The Modjadji Reserve is the birthplace of the famous lineage of Rain Queens of the Lobedu tribe, who are said to have mystical powers that can influence the rainfall.Mist usually surrounds the Modjadi village, and the Modjadi Cycad Reserve is said to be one of the most unique plant kingdoms in Africa.The Ukhahlamba-Drakensberg Park is one of the official World Heritage sites in South Africa. Originally known as the “Dragon Mountains”, the site offers waterfalls, mountain peaks and rocks decorated with San rock art.Once home to the ancient shamans and medicine men; the Drakensberg is also known for pilgrimages taken to the area for those who want to meditate peacefully.The San and Bushman rock painting are also said to represent the ritual called, the Great Dance. In this dance, the dancer goes into a trance, through which the San say they can harness a form of spiritual power that is like electricity. They use this power for healing, hunting, and making rain.Safari with a purposeFor travellers looking for holidays with a deeper meaning, Spiritual Safaris, a Western Cape based tourism company now offers tourists with a unique travel package.According to the company, the trip is structured in way that gives the traveller an opportunity to have a deeper connection with nature than that which is usually offered by mainstream tourism packages.The five-day tour consists of a five-hour train journey from Cape Town to the Karoo. On the first night the tourists will partake in stargazing with a professional guide.On the second and third day, the tourists get the opportunity to explore the Swartberg mountains and enjoy a talk by palaeontologist, Dr Judy Maquire.In addition to studying fossils, Maquire has extensive experience in working with the Bushmen. She has closely studied their survival as well as their use of food plants.Early birds can also enjoy a 5:30am walk to the nearby show grounds to watch horses in training. After breakfast, the group is then taken to a hidden valley in the heart of the Swartberg mountain range, described as “Die Hel”.On the fourth day, the tour moves to the southern Cape area of Gamkaskloof valley. Here, tourists have the opportunity to meditate, listen to nature and take time for reflection.On the last day of the tour, visitors enjoy a laid back morning, before a trip on a private jet after lunch, where they are jetted back to Cape Town.Many travellers claim that the tour is spiritually rejuvenating. On its website, there are testimonials posted where happy customers share their experiences.One particular satisfied customer, Judyie Al-Bilali from the US, says this of the trip, “It was deeply relaxing and at the same time had a spiritual intensity and a magnificent opportunity to connect with the natural world.“I started dreaming intensely in the Karoo and the dreams have continued, bright, complex, colourful, clear. There is undoubtedly a rich Shamanic tradition connected to the land.”Do you have queries or comments about this article? Email Khanyi Magubane at [email protected] articlesHolidays that save the worldSA Safari Disney style The adventure starts here South Africa’s national parks World heritage in South Africa Useful linksSpiritual SafarisModjadji historySouth African Heritage Resources AgencyThe Drakensberglast_img read more

A roadmap for South Africa by Miller Matola

first_imgHaving a national plan for SA is not goodenough, says Brand South Africa CEO MillerMatola. What is needed is a social pact withcommitment from all sectors of society tomake the country achieve its potential.Certainty breeds confidence. If the recent results of a Moody’s Investor Service action are anything to go by, the best way to garner confidence in a country and to represent it as a stable and consistent environment for investors is to have a plan and stick to it. Not just any plan, however; it has to be credible.Commentators and experts are in agreement that the recently released National Development Plan is both comprehensive and credible. It identifies the major issues which still need to be addressed in SA and is the road map as to how we can start to do so. If implemented and followed, the plan will also remove a lot of thedoubt and frustration which continues to put our economy at risk.Key to Moody’s decision to downgrade SA’s outlook last month was what they termed political risk.According to reports, Moody’s action was driven by “the growing risk that the political commitment to low-budget deficits and the ability to keep within current debt targets could be undermined by popular pressures and rising internal strains within the African National Congress and its labour union allies”.Proudly South AfricaWe believe their assessment is flawed and the government and the National Treasury and Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe in particular, have criticised their judgement.What the report does highlight, however, is the need for SA to change some perceptions of our investment and economic climate.SA remains a globally competitive economy and our best practices – in banking, stock market regulation and auditing and reporting in particular – have drawn favourable ratings from other world bodies.The World Economic Forum’s 2011/12 Global Competiveness Report identified various competitive advantages enjoyed by SA.Among others, SA was ranked first in the strength of its auditing and reporting standards as well as regulation of securities exchanges. We were ranked second in soundness of banks and corporate boards and third in protection of minority shareholders’ interest and the availability of financial services.At 50th overall, SA has the highest competitiveness ranking in sub-Saharan Africa and is second only to China among the Brics (Brazil, Russia, India, China and SA) economies.The world regards our bankers, financial regulators and chartered accountants as some of the best in the world. Investors want to trust the numbers, and with us they do.However, the World Economic Forum identified key areas where SA is weak – notably labour market efficiency, health and primary education, the health of the workforce, rigid hiring and firing practices, a lack of flexibility in wage determination by companies and the significant tensions in labour-employer relations.Again, there are valuable lessons from this which show how we can improve our rankings. The National Development Plan gives us the direction to achieve this. It also shows that we understand our problems as a society and have a credible long-term structural plan to achieve improvements that will improve our reputation and competitiveness.The plan does not simply gloss over the issues which we face. It lists various goals, but among those which are pertinent to the conversations around a stable economic environment are: improving education and training, providing quality health care, building a capable state, fighting corruption and enhancing accountability, transforming society and uniting the nation.SA has the means, the goodwill, the people and the resources to eliminate poverty and reduce inequality, but it will require leadership from all sectors of society, a capable state and a social pact.Having a plan is not enough. What we also need is a collective determination to meet the goals set out in the national plan.The reality is that we are facing major challenges in labour, health and education.The government has now outlined how we can meet these challenges. An important aspect of the development plan is its emphasis on active citizenry.Key to making the plan a success is that South Africans get behind it and play their part to meet the goals outlined in the plan. The obvious benefit of this is that we create a more successful society, a country which functions at a much improved level and an overall better place to live.Added to that will be a greater sense of policy certainty which will improve our international competitiveness in a world of great uncertainty. This will help attract investment and improve growth.The plan is currently open for public input for four to six months of public engagement and refinement. President Jacob Zuma will then initiate a process whereby the cabinet considers the refined plan for approval. Once it is passed, it will be a plan for all South Africans irrespective of race, creed, class or political affiliation – a plan which will cultivate the values of a caring society. Before then, however, South Africans from all sectors and with a wide-range of expertise must play their part and lend their voices to the debate surrounding the plan.We must all help refine it and make sure that, when it is adopted, it is not just a government plan but a vision accepted and created by the nation.International experiences suggest that trade, tourism and investment respond well to the kind of long-term policy planning we as a nation are doing. And that will improve our competitiveness and give a firm answer to the ratings agencies. Certainty breeds confidence. If the recent results of a Moody’s Investor Service action are anything to go by, the best way to garner confidence in a country and to represent it as a stable and consistent environment for investors is to have a plan and stick to it. Not just any plan, however; it has to be credible.Commentators and experts are in agreement that the recently released National Development Plan is both comprehensive and credible. It identifies the major issues which still need to be addressed in SA and is the road map as to how we can start to do so. If implemented and followed, the plan will also remove a lot of the doubt and frustration which continues to put our economy at risk.Key to Moody’s decision to downgrade SA’s outlook last month was what they termed political risk.According to reports, Moody’s action was driven by “the growing risk that the political commitment to low-budget deficits and the ability to keep within current debt targets could be undermined by popular pressures and rising internal strains within the African National Congress and its labour union allies”. What the report does highlight, however, is the need for SA to change some perceptions of our investment and economic climate.SA remains a globally competitive economy and our best practices – in banking, stock market regulation and auditing and reporting in particular – have drawn favourable ratings from other world bodies.The World Economic Forum’s 2011/12 Global Competiveness Report identified various competitive advantages enjoyed by SA.Among others, SA was ranked first in the strength of its auditing and reporting standards as well as regulation of securities exchanges. We were ranked second in soundness of banks and corporate boards and third in protection of minority shareholders’ interest and the availability of financial services.At 50th overall, SA has the highest competitiveness ranking in sub-Saharan Africa and is second only to China among the Brics (Brazil, Russia, India, China and SA) economies.The world regards our bankers, financial regulators and chartered accountants as some of the best in the world. Investors want to trust the numbers, and with us they do.However, the World Economic Forum identified key areas where SA is weak – notably labour market efficiency, health and primary education, the health of the workforce, rigid hiring and firing practices, a lack of flexibility in wage determination by companies and the significant tensions in labour-employer relations.Again, there are valuable lessons from this which show how we can improve our rankings. The National Development Plan gives us the direction to achieve this. It also shows that we understand our problems as a society and have a credible long-term structural plan to achieve improvements that will improve our reputation and competitiveness.The plan does not simply gloss over the issues which we face. It lists various goals, but among those which are pertinent to the conversations around a stable economic environment are: improving education and training, providing quality health care, building a capable state, fighting corruption and enhancing accountability, transforming society and uniting the nation.SA has the means, the goodwill, the people and the resources to eliminate poverty and reduce inequality, but it will require leadership from all sectors of society, a capable state and a social pact.Having a plan is not enough. What we also need is a collective determination to meet the goals set out in the national plan.The reality is that we are facing major challenges in labour, health and education.The government has now outlined how we can meet these challenges. An important aspect of the development plan is its emphasis on active citizenry.Key to making the plan a success is that South Africans get behind it and play their part to meet the goals outlined in the plan. The obvious benefit of this is that we create a more successful society, a country which functions at a much improved level and an overall better place to live.Added to that will be a greater sense of policy certainty which will improve our international competitiveness in a world of great uncertainty. This will help attract investment and improve growth.The plan is currently open for public input for four to six months of public engagement and refinement. President Jacob Zuma will then initiate a process whereby the cabinet considers the refined plan for approval. Once it is passed, it will be a plan for all South Africans irrespective of race, creed, class or political affiliation – a plan which will cultivate the values of a caring society. Before then, however, South Africans from all sectors and with a wide-range of expertise must play their part and lend their voices to the debate surrounding the plan.We must all help refine it and make sure that, when it is adopted, it is not just a government plan but a vision accepted and created by the nation.International experiences suggest that trade, tourism and investment respond well to the kind of long-term policy planning we as a nation are doing. And that will improve our competitiveness and give a firm answer to the ratings agencies.l Miller Motala is the CEO of Brand South Africa, previously known as the International Marketing Council of SA.Source: www.iol.co.za/mercurylast_img read more

South Africa has plenty to offer international visitors

first_img16 October 2014The Orlando Cooling Towers in Soweto offer bungee jumping to visitors. (Photo: Gauteng Tourism)Britons Harbin Dawson and his sister Suzanne are regular visitors to South Africa. Each time they landed at OR Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg, they would immediately catch a connecting flight Cape Town to visit relatives.Born to a South African mother in West Sussex, in the south of England, the Dawsons visit South Africa once every four years and have never toured the rest of the country, except to visit relatives in Cape Town. It is only recently that they realised South Africa has plenty to offer visitors and they decided to explore Johannesburg.Vilakazi StreetOn a tour of Soweto, South Africa’s most famous township, the Dawsons decided to visit Vilakazi Street, the only street in the world to have housed two Nobel Prize winners – Nelson Mandela and Archbishop Desmond Tutu.“It is our first time touring Johannesburg,’ said 18-year-old Suzanne who, together with Harbin, their mother and extended family members, was having lunch at Thrive Cafe. Suzanne said Vilakazi Street is her favourite spot whenever she and her brother visit Johannesburg.Harbin echoed his sister’s sentiments, saying: “It’s our first time in Soweto, and so far, this is our only and favourite spot in Johannesburg. We normally just land at the airport and leave for Cape Town. This is a nice experience for us’.The Dawsons, who had been in the country for three weeks, said they would love to tour other parts of the country but, unfortunately, have to leave for England in two days’ time.Increasing international visitorsThe Dawsons are just a part of the increasing number of international tourists who are discovering the wonders that South Africa can offer visitors. The continuous increase in the number of tourists visiting the country remains one of the biggest success stories of the past 20 years.The latest release from Statistics South Africa (StatsSA) indicate that International arrivals have surged by 300% since 1994 to reach nearly 15-million in 2013. In 2013 alone, South Africa welcomed a total of 9 616 964 tourists, up from the 9 188 368 tourists that visited South Africa in 2012.South Africa’s international tourist arrivals grew at an annual average growth rate of 7.4% between 2011 and 2013, well above the global average of 4.5% during this period. The country also saw good growth out of Europe, its largest overseas market for tourist arrivals, in 2013. A total of 1 494 978 European tourist arrivals were recorded in 2013, a 7.0% increase on the 1 396 978 European tourists who visited South Africa in 2012.Hermanus, a favourite tourist spotThe Dawsons said when they are in the Western Cape, their favourite spot is Hermanus – a town on the southern coast, famous for whale watching during the winter and spring. Suzanne said she also admires the Waterfront and the beaches in Cape Town. “I love the view and everything about it,’ she said.The Dawsons said they find South Africa very welcoming and friendly. They said given the opportunity, they would visit more often. “There’s a nice, different feeling you get in South Africa, like. I don’t even know how to describe it, It gives you that natural feel,’ said Suzanne, who will begin studying Philosophy in England soon.In total, South Africa recorded 417 582 North American tourists in 2013, up from 393 446 in 2012. South Africa’s second largest market, the USA, accounted for 348 646 tourist arrivals in 2013, reflecting 6.7% growth on the 326 643 Americans that visited South Africa in 2012.US visitorsThirty-three year-old Brad Haynes from Tennessee, in the US, was visiting South Africa for the first time with his friend Josh Johnson. They said their stay in South Africa has been an amazing experience, although they have only visited Cape Town and Johannesburg.“The diversity and everything about the country have been amazing. There are no other places we have been to, that are similar to parts of America, like South Africa.“Cape Town is pretty similar to San Francisco, in terms of climate changes and its crazy people. Johannesburg has been awesome too,’ said Haynes, who works as an engineer in the US.Johnson said their South Africa tour had been a good experience. “Everybody is very friendly. We have been here for a few weeks. If we get another chance, we would love to tour Johannesburg more, and also go to Robben Island and the Drakensburg Mountains,’ he said.Thrive CafeThe Head Chef and Events Architect at Thrive Cafe in Vilakazi Street, Paddy Khuele, said the restaurant opened its doors in November last year, and already employs 12 South African youth.“Vilakazi Street lacked that cosmopolitan and contemporary offering. We wanted South Africans and tourists, who are not as adventurous, to find an exquisite restaurant in Soweto, which they would normally find in the suburbs of Johannesburg,’ Khuele said, adding that tourists contributed vastly in generating profit for the restaurant.However, the majority of support came from locals, who previously travelled to Sandton to get what Thrive Cafe offers, according to Khuele. “The ratio is almost 60:40, where the 60% of our clients are locals and 40% tourists. Even locals who are not from Soweto come to Thrive Cafe. We get a positive response from locals,’ he said.Safe environmentThe growing number of tourists in Soweto owes to the safe environment in the township and dispels the fallacious perception that South African townships are crime ridden. Khuele said ever since he started operating along Vilakazi Street, no crime has been reported along the street.Twenty-year-old Boikanyo Mataboge is one of the many street vendors on Vilakazi Street peddling craft ware. He said t-shirts with Nelson Mandela printed on them are his top-selling items.He realised his artistic talent in his teenage years and decided to turn it into a career about four years ago. However, he only started trading along Vilakazi Street in 2012.“I use recycled material to create my craft products, sometimes I buy off-cuts,’ said Mataboge, who grew up in Palm Ridge but now resides in Phomolong, Soweto.Mataboge said business along Vilakazi Street had its peak and off-peak days, with Wednesdays and weekends being the busiest days. “Sometime I subcontract another artist, when I see the workload piles up.’Mataboge said most of his customers are foreign visitors and he would like to see more locals supporting his business.“[Local visitors] are afraid of buying. They hold a perception that everything sold in Vilakazi Street is expensive, which is not the case,’ he said.SAinfo reporter and SAnews.govlast_img read more

I Want My Hover Bike! Inventor Makes Real-Life Star Wars Tech

first_imgBuilt by Aerofex, a California company, the hover bike finally perfects a design that was scrapped in the 1960’s due stability issues. Like earlier versions, it achieves flight through the rotation of very large fan blades, like a helicopter. The difference is in control bars near the knees that react when the driver leans on them, allowing the vehicle responds like a horse or surfboard. (Aviators call this system kinesthetic control, a tem coined by Charles H. Zimmerman, who in the 1950’s created “flying shoes” and a “flying pancake” for the US military.) Aerofex’s hover bike has been tested at 30 miles an hour and a height of 15 feet, and it has flown under bridges, in trees, and around buildings. “Think of it as lowering the threshold of flight, down to the domain of ATV’s (all-terrain vehicles),” said Mark De Roche, an aerospace engineer and the founder of Aerofex in an interview with InnovationNewsDaily.  Aerofex’s goal to break “the barriers that limit access to the benefits of flight,” according to the company’s website. “Imagine personal flight as intuitive as riding a bike,” reads another passage on the site.So when can we expect these flying contraptions to hit the market, and how much will they cost? According to De Roche, the answer is… “No.” Aerofex has no intention of offering these bikes to the public. De Roche sees them being used by search-and-rescue teams in difficult terrain, by farmers, and by the military in the form of an autonomous supply carrier.Aerofex’s hover bike isn’t the only small flying machine trying to get off the ground, although it has racked up the most successful test flights. An Australian competitor has yet to complete a successful untethered test flight despite a similar design and ambitions to reach the mass market. What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces fruzsina eordogh Footage of a hover bike test flight surfaced on the Internet this week and quickly sent sci-fi nerds and techies on a heavy Star Wars nostalgia trip. The video is enthralling not only because it’s a futurist’s wet dream. The vehicle’s user-friendly design could usher in an era of low-altitude flight as a form of daily, personal transportation. Related Posts The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Tags:#mobile#web last_img read more

State Income Tax and Federal Net Operating Losses

first_imgStates differ in how they treat the federal net operating loss deduction on state corporate income tax returns. The variety of state approaches can make compliance complex for multistate corporations. However, knowing these differences can provide tax planning opportunities for corporate income taxpayers, especially multistate corporations.How Are NOLs Treated Under Federal Law?A federal NOL deduction is available to corporate taxpayer under IRC Sec. 172. Generally, an NOL arises when a taxpayer’s deductions are more than their income for the year.A NOL is not deducted in the tax year it occurs. Instead, the NOL is carried back or carried forward to other tax years, then deducted. The lengths of time for carrying NOLs back or forward are called carryback and carryover periods.Before the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) was enacted, a NOL could be carried back two tax years and carried forward up to 20 years. Now, the Code allows NOLs to be carried forward indefinitely.Do States Follow the Federal NOL Rules?In general, many states don’t.   Common practices in states include:computing state income tax starting with federal taxable income before NOLs;requiring taxpayers to add back the amount of the federal NOL deduction to income; ormodifying the federal NOL deduction.No Federal NOL Deduction in State ComputationApproximately half of the states do not allow the federal NOL deduction. Most of these states base a corporation’s taxable income on federal taxable income before the federal NOL deduction (federal Form 1120, Line 28). States that follow this approach include:California;New York;Massachusetts; andNorth Carolina.Adding Back the NOL DeductionIn a number of states, corporations must add back the amount of the federal NOL deduction to their state income. The state may then allow a net operating loss to be calculated using its own rules. States that follow this approach include:Florida;Illinois;Michigan; andSouth Carolina.Modifications to Federal NOL DeductionSome states modify the federal NOL. For example, Maryland conforms to the federal NOL deduction, unless:an extended carryback is claimed;federal taxable income subtraction modifications exceed addition modifications in the year of loss; orsubtraction modifications include foreign source dividends.Other states like Missouri and Virginia require an addition or add back for the federal NOL deduction only under certain circumstances.Conformity to Federal NOL Carryforward and Carryback RulesState carryforward and carryback periods vary significantly. Many states did not permit carrybacks prior to the enactment of TCJA. Additionally, states that did permit carrybacks often decoupled from extended federal carryback periods. Different approaches that are taken across the states include:prohibiting NOL carrybacks (e.g., North Carolina);conforming to federal carryback periods (e.g., Mississippi);conforming to federal carryforward periods (e.g., Wisconsin);allowing carryback periods of two or three years (e.g., Utah and California); andallowing carryforward periods that range from five to twenty years (e.g. Rhode Island and Illinois).In a later post, we will explore how states have responded to changes in the NOL deduction made by the TCJA.By Catherine S. Agdeppa, J.D.Login to read more on CCHAnswerConnect.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

Roselyn Doria shrugs off criticisms as she accepts 1st Best Middle Blocker award

first_imgMANILA, Philippines—Roselyn Doria knows that it’s best to accept any accolade with class and humility.ADVERTISEMENT Doria finished the season with 0.69 kill blocks per frame for the Lady Bulldogs, who finished the season at no. 6 with a 4-10 record, while the 2nd Best Middle Blocker Maddie Madayag of Ateneo tallied 0.86 kill blocks per set.This did not bode well with some fans.NU’s quiet captain, however, rose through the unwarranted hate and chose to savor the moment.“I’m thankful because I didn’t expect this,” said Doria. “All I could think of was I wasn’t going to win any award as long as I know that I gave my best this season.”ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Two-day strike in Bicol fails to cripple transport Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games PLAY LIST 01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games02:24Sotto urges Robredo to accept antidrug post02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss LATEST STORIES National University’s graduating senior was named as the 1st Best Middle Blocker of the UAAP Season 81 women’s volleyball tournament, much to the chagrin of some fans.Doria, however, humbly took the trophy and let the award speak for her worth.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logistics“My parents told me to just be quiet because I didn’t take any part in all that controversy, whatever was given to me then I will accept it,” said Doria in Filipino Wednesday at Mall of Asia Arena.“I won’t entertain what people are saying about me.” Hunger for winning never goes away for Alex Cabagnot Duterte wants probe of SEA Games mess Catholic schools seek legislated pay hike, toocenter_img ‘Rebel attack’ no cause for concern-PNP, AFP MOST READ DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew View comments Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Ethel Booba twits Mocha over 2 toilets in one cubicle at SEA Games venuelast_img read more

10 months agoLiverpool boss Klopp’s Christmas Message: Why these players so special

first_imgLiverpool boss Klopp’s Christmas Message: Why these players so specialby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool boss Jurgen Klopp has paid tribute to his players in his Christmas Day message.Klopp says a key to their success so far this season is the ability of his team to ignore “the noise” of the media and press.He told Liverpoolfc.com: “This is my fourth Christmas as the manager of this incredible football club and although I am not the kind of guy to allow myself to look backwards, I think it is fair to say we have had an incredible ride in 2018 with some real highs and a couple of disappointments.”That’s what gives me the confidence and belief there is more to come from these boys in 2019, that there is more to come from this journey we are all involved in.”We can – and should – all be proud of what the team have done so far this season, but this is only the beginning and there is still such a long way to go, both this season and in terms of what this group of players can achieve.”The best thing about these boys, and what has helped us have such a good start to the season, is they do not listen to the noise; they are 100 per cent every single day in training and every single matchday. We know when we say ‘one game at a time’ some people might consider it football talk, but that really is the way for us. It is the philosophy that has got us to where we are currently.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

10 months agoVan Dijk appreciates ‘bond’ with Liverpool fans

first_imgVan Dijk appreciates ‘bond’ with Liverpool fansby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool defender Virgil van Dijk admits he feels a close “bond” with the fans.Thursday marks the first anniversary of the Reds agreeing a record-breaking £75million deal with Southampton for the Dutch centre-back.“I definitely feel the bond we have with the supporters,” he told Liverpoolfc.com.“It’s about being normal. We’re not better than anyone else. We are all human beings and the manager is also putting that out as well.“He has been loved by everyone and I think it is because he has been himself. As a player, he will give you his honest opinion and be straight with you. It’s who he is.“I’m obviously aware of my song the fans have created for me. It’s brilliant. Like everyone else, I first saw it on Twitter. Now I’ve heard it in the last few games.“It means a lot to me and to have such a great song already is fantastic. It’s recognition of how things have been going and I am very proud to have a song. I can’t tell you how great it is to hear my name being sung in the stadium.“I have a good relationship with the fans and I see their comments on social media from time to time. For a club like Liverpool, you need to give your blood, sweat and tears on the pitch and if you do that then I think you will be adored because you’ve done everything possible to win the game.“It feels like it is an exciting time at Liverpool. Since I have been here, I have had some fantastic moments with this team.“With the help of all my team-mates, the staff and the fans, I believe it can only get better and hopefully we are going to achieve amazing things with the group for all the fans supporting us throughout the world.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Jim Walton the president of CNN Worldwide has re

first_imgJim Walton, the president of CNN Worldwide, has resigned. He said that CNN needs new thinking and leadership and will leave the Turner owned news channel at the end of the year.
Walton has been in charge of CNN for a decade and announced his decision to step down on Friday.“For some time, I’ve been talking with [Turner Broadcasting CEO] Phil Kent about wanting to make a change, and he supports my decision,” he said in an email to staff. “CNN needs new thinking. That starts with a new leader who brings a different perspective, different experiences and a new plan, one who will build on our great foundation and will commit to seeing it through.”
While CNN has been performing well internationally, it has struggled in recent times in its domestic US market, recording some of its worst-ever ratings in its two most recent quarters.
Kent will lead the search for Walton’s successor.Time Warner CEO Jeff Bewkes paid tribute to Walton. “When Jim Walton assumed the presidency of CNN in 2003, it was underperforming and earnings were in serious decline.  Since then, he and CNN have tripled earnings, doubled margin and delivered annual growth of 15%,” he said. “I respect him personally and professionally and support the decision he and Phil Kent have reached.”last_img read more

Watch Unity should remain the focal point of our movement – Muscat

first_imgPartit Laburista leader Joseph Muscat said that ‘unity should remain the focal point of the movement’ as he addressed party activists gathered outside Partit Laburista Headquarters in Ħamrun.Hours after the first indications were pronounced, Muscat spoke from the party headquarters balcony addressing those who gathered outside. The PL leader thanked those who voted the Labour party in the European Parliament and local council elections. Muscat claimed that what unites the people, is bigger than what separates them, arguing that people want unity.READ: Update: PL wins with 55% of the votes – Prime MinisterIn his speech, Muscat claimed that for the tenth time, Maltese have entrusted the Labour movement with their trust. Describing the win as historic, Muscat said that those who voted for PL have written the political history of the country, since no party had managed to achieve such results.According to Muscat, he was initially wrong when he claimed that the PL won the EP elections with 45,000 in a comment he gave to the state TV, saying that projections now show that the PL won with some 48,000 votes.Speaking about unity, Muscat reiterated that it is the party’s focal point. He urged the activists to remain grounded.READ: LIVE: Follow what’s happening inside the Counting HallREAD: Watch: ‘Our samples show less difference between PL and PN’ – ArrigoWhatsApp <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a> SharePrintlast_img read more