International briefs: CNN axes 400 as it streamlines web services

first_img Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. International briefs: CNN axes 400 as it streamlines web servicesOn 23 Jan 2001 in Personnel Today Americancable news channel CNN announced last week that it is to axe nearly 10 per centof its workforce. The 400 jobs are believed to from its interactive unit, whichincludes CNN.com and CNNfn.com. CNN plans to incorporate its news websites intothe television channel, a strategy used commonly by media companies to cutcosts.www.cnn.com Motorolato cut 2,500 manufacturing jobs Mobilephone and computer chip company Motorola is to stop manufacturing at itsharvard plant in Illinois in North America. About 2,500 jobs will go within thenext six months as part of the company’s long-term strategy to improveefficiency and financial performance.Another2,500 employees will continue to work at the plant in the customer servicedepartment. Motorola has lost market share to Nokia.www.motorola.com Renault extends Euro works council globallyRenault,the French-based car manufacturer is to extend its European works council to aglobal council. Employee representatives from its operations in Brazil,Argentina, Romania and South Korea will join European representatives on theglobal works council. The entire council will meet once a year to consider thegroup’s consolidated accounts. The global council will be supported by asecretariat of one full-time member of staff and seven part-timers. www.renault.com last_img read more

Do you limber up before a hard day’s work?

first_img Comments are closed. Do you limber up before a hard day’s work?On 1 Jan 2004 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is looking for companies thatencourage their staff to do warming up or stretching exercises before startingwork, as part of a project to look at the benefits of limbering up beforeknuckling down for the day. The study is being carried out by ergonomics consultancy Human Engineeringand Waseda University in Japan, where many people already do stretchingexercises at the start of the day to help prevent pain, discomfort or damage tothe joints and muscles. In some countries, warm-up exercises are recommended as a way of preparingpeople for lifting, carrying or other work in factories or offices. However,little is known about the effectiveness of this, said the HSE. If the exercises do work, promoting them could help the HSE achieve itstargets to reduce work-related injuries and ill health. The project will look for evidence that certain kinds of exercises areuseful in tackling ill health. If the evidence is favourable, the project willexamine the cultural differences between UK and Japanese workplaces toinvestigate any potential obstacles to the adoption of warming up exercises inthe UK – such as perceived costs or negative stereotypes. The researchers would like to hear from any companies or individuals who havefirst-hand experience of introducing or participating in limbering up exercisesas a way of preparing for work. Contact Nick Colford at Human Engineering on0117 962 0888. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

People are moving home half as often during their lives than ten years ago, claims Savills

first_imgThe financial crisis of 2008 still casts a long shadow over the UK property market and that includes a halving in the number of times people move home during their lives, research by Savills has highlighted.­Its examination of home moves reveals that the average has dropped from 3.6 times to 1.8 times per family since the crash, a figure that stubbornly refuses to budge.In comments made to the BBC this morning, Savills’ Head of Research Lucian Cook suggests that unless people are enabled to move house more often,  there is little point helping first time buyers on to the first rung of the property ladder.The areas where people are moving the most are in Wandsworth, Basingstoke and Deane, Norwich, Rushmoor, Lambeth, Corby, Swindon, Aylesbury Vale, South Norfolk and Bracknell Forest.The destinations where people are staying put the most include Pembrokeshire, Harrow, Ceredigion, Blaenau Gwent, Brent, Wolverhampton, Isle of Anglesey, Sefton, Newham and Redbridge.“Those not trading up are the forgotten people of the housing market,” Lucian Cook told the BBC.Savills categorises housing markets in the UK into three types. These are areas where house prices are stagnant and don’t produce the equity gains people need to move up the ladder, areas where price rises are so huge people can’t afford or want to borrow the money to make the next step, and ‘Goldilocks’ areas where prices are neither too  hot nor too cold – enabling smoother house moving flows.One output of this problem is that home extensions are booming as home owners stay put, and particularly while homes can be re-mortgaged at very low interest rates to pay  for them.Also, planning rules were relaxed recently to enable permission-free extensions on many houses, although the  more relaxed rules on single-storey extensions run out in May next year.Read more about the housing market.housing market Lucian cook moving house Savills March 28, 2018Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » Agencies & People » People are moving home half as often during their lives than ten years ago, claims Savills previous nextAgencies & PeoplePeople are moving home half as often during their lives than ten years ago, claims SavillsAgent reveals the most obvious long-term affect of the financial crash of 2008 on the housing market.Nigel Lewis28th March 201801,364 Viewslast_img read more

Panel affirms immorality of capital punishment

first_imgTwo Notre Dame professors and a retired local priest asserted capital punishment is immoral at a Wednesday panel discussion. Adjunct Instructor of Writing and Rhetoric Ed Kelly said he opposes the death penalty for three reasons. “First of all, there are systems of privilege and oppression in place in this country that I think make it virtually impossible for the death penalty to be applied fairly and justly,” he said. “Consequently, we have many people of color and many, many poor people who find themselves on death row, and that’s unfair.” Kelly said he believes it is impossible to combat violence with violence, and that state-sanctioned violence is nonsensical. He said he also opposes the death penalty because people who are not imprisoned often have much more in common with prisoners than they expect. “I have four children,” Kelly said. “None of my daughters has been raped. Our only son has not been killed … Still, I would argue that all people are redeemable, that redemption is possible for everyone. Thus, I’m opposed to the death penalty.” Fr. Tom McNally, a retired priest who volunteers as a chaplain at the Indiana State Prison, shared his experience speaking with prisoners on death row shortly before their executions. He said tensions run high in the small rooms where executions occur near midnight. “The men come in [and] they’re on a gurney,” McNally said. “I always wave and bless them, a last blessing, and they wave back … They close the blinds, and then a poison is injected … All the time that this is going on, there’s just this heaviness in my heart.” McNally said his experiences witnessing prisoners’ executions have caused him to consider capital punishment “terribly unfair.” Jay Tidmarsh, a professor of law, said capital punishment is unjust because some prosecutors will ask a court to put a prisoner to death while others will not. “Different prosecutors in the state have different attitudes,” Tidmarsh said. “The arbitrariness in that sense of the death penalty is, to me, stunning. It’s not the quality of the act [that determines whether someone is put to death] … In many circumstances, it is the quality of the person who decides whether or not to seek the death penalty.” The judicial system deludes all involved to believe they are not responsible for putting someone to death, Tidmarsh said. “We’re supposed to have systems of rules that are relatively fair and neutral,” he said. “The reality is in our system no one actually is responsible for putting someone to death. We have divided up the system of responsibility in such a way where it’s always somebody else, or we believe, at least, that it’s always somebody else.” Tidmarsh said the Supreme Court has made clear that automatic death sentences for certain crimes are unconstitutional. Instead, whether someone is put to death must be decided on a case-by-case basis. “You have to allow individuals to mitigate, to explain,” Tidmarsh said. “It can’t be automatic.” Kelly said he does not believe capital punishment does not deter crime. “In fact … the surest way to make a person violent is to punish him, and of course, capital punishment is the worst form of punishment,” he said. It is difficult, however, to argue capital punishment is “cruel and unusual,” as described by the United States Constitution, Tidmarsh said. “If you believe that the Constitution ought to be interpreted faithfully to the meaning of the people who originally adopted it, they executed people back then for lots of crimes that today we would never execute someone for,” he said “[But] what wasn’t cruel 200 years ago might be cruel today.” If most states abolish the death penalty, the Supreme Court might rule capital punishment cruel and unusual under evolving notions of decency, Tidmarsh said. Kelly said although he is generally in favor of sentencing prisoners of capital crimes to life imprisonment, parole should be possible for prisoners who prove they have changed for the better. “What you really need to do is take prisoners who have been put in prison and have them work on transforming,” he said. “It’s quite possible for the lives of people who have done terrible things to be halfway decent, even the imprisoned.” Tidmarsh said he thinks many prisoners are sentenced to death because victims’ families demonstrate an unwillingness to forgive the perpetrators. Kelly said executing criminals rarely helps family members heal. “People talk about closure,” he said. “But there’s really no closure for many families.” It is important for Catholics to oppose the death penalty, Kelly said. “I think Sr. [Helen] Prejean [an advocate for the abolition of capital punishment] would argue that all life is sacred, not just innocent life,” he said. “And if you believe all life is sacred, how can you believe capital punishment is okay?”,Two Notre Dame professors and a retired local priest asserted capital punishment is immoral at a Wednesday panel discussion. Adjunct Instructor of Writing and Rhetoric Ed Kelly said he opposes the death penalty for three reasons. “First of all, there are systems of privilege and oppression in place in this country that I think make it virtually impossible for the death penalty to be applied fairly and justly,” he said. “Consequently, we have many people of color and many, many poor people who find themselves on death row, and that’s unfair.” Kelly said he believes it is impossible to combat violence with violence, and that state-sanctioned violence is nonsensical. He said he also opposes the death penalty because people who are not imprisoned often have much more in common with prisoners than they expect. “I have four children,” Kelly said. “None of my daughters has been raped. Our only son has not been killed … Still, I would argue that all people are redeemable, that redemption is possible for everyone. Thus, I’m opposed to the death penalty.” Fr. Tom McNally, a retired priest who volunteers as a chaplain at the Indiana State Prison, shared his experience speaking with prisoners on death row shortly before their executions. He said tensions run high in the small rooms where executions occur near midnight. “The men come in [and] they’re on a gurney,” McNally said. “I always wave and bless them, a last blessing, and they wave back … They close the blinds, and then a poison is injected … All the time that this is going on, there’s just this heaviness in my heart.” McNally said his experiences witnessing prisoners’ executions have caused him to consider capital punishment “terribly unfair.” Jay Tidmarsh, a professor of law, said capital punishment is unjust because some prosecutors will ask a court to put a prisoner to death while others will not. “Different prosecutors in the state have different attitudes,” Tidmarsh said. “The arbitrariness in that sense of the death penalty is, to me, stunning. It’s not the quality of the act [that determines whether someone is put to death] … In many circumstances, it is the quality of the person who decides whether or not to seek the death penalty.” The judicial system deludes all involved to believe they are not responsible for putting someone to death, Tidmarsh said. “We’re supposed to have systems of rules that are relatively fair and neutral,” he said. “The reality is in our system no one actually is responsible for putting someone to death. We have divided up the system of responsibility in such a way where it’s always somebody else, or we believe, at least, that it’s always somebody else.” Tidmarsh said the Supreme Court has made clear that automatic death sentences for certain crimes are unconstitutional. Instead, whether someone is put to death must be decided on a case-by-case basis. “You have to allow individuals to mitigate, to explain,” Tidmarsh said. “It can’t be automatic.” Kelly said he does not believe capital punishment does not deter crime. “In fact … the surest way to make a person violent is to punish him, and of course, capital punishment is the worst form of punishment,” he said. It is difficult, however, to argue capital punishment is “cruel and unusual,” as described by the United States Constitution, Tidmarsh said. “If you believe that the Constitution ought to be interpreted faithfully to the meaning of the people who originally adopted it, they executed people back then for lots of crimes that today we would never execute someone for,” he said “[But] what wasn’t cruel 200 years ago might be cruel today.” If most states abolish the death penalty, the Supreme Court might rule capital punishment cruel and unusual under evolving notions of decency, Tidmarsh said. Kelly said although he is generally in favor of sentencing prisoners of capital crimes to life imprisonment, parole should be possible for prisoners who prove they have changed for the better. “What you really need to do is take prisoners who have been put in prison and have them work on transforming,” he said. “It’s quite possible for the lives of people who have done terrible things to be halfway decent, even the imprisoned.” Tidmarsh said he thinks many prisoners are sentenced to death because victims’ families demonstrate an unwillingness to forgive the perpetrators. Kelly said executing criminals rarely helps family members heal. “People talk about closure,” he said. “But there’s really no closure for many families.” It is important for Catholics to oppose the death penalty, Kelly said. “I think Sr. [Helen] Prejean [an advocate for the abolition of capital punishment] would argue that all life is sacred, not just innocent life,” he said. “And if you believe all life is sacred, how can you believe capital punishment is okay?”last_img read more

Robert Dean Botjer Named to Board of Champlain College

first_imgBURLINGTON, Vt. Robert Dean Botjer of Charlotte has been named to the Board of Trustees at Champlain College in Burlington, Vermont. Botjer is the chairman of Eurowest Inns, Inc., which owns the Inn at Essex, and he is the retired senior vice president and division head for Latin America for Citigroup.Volunteer activities include serving as a board member and past chairman of the Greater Miami Tennis and Educational Foundation. Botjer holds a bachelor’s degree from Ohio Wesleyan University and a master’s from Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.Botjer joins the board of a private, baccalaureate college that offers professionally focused programs balanced by a strong core curriculum. Founded in 1878, Champlain College is a leader in educating students to become skilled practitioners, effective professionals and global citizens.last_img read more

Colombian Government Gives Green Light For Rebel Hostage Release

first_imgBy Dialogo November 25, 2009 The Colombian government has authorized the International Committee of the Red Cross and the Catholic Church to make “the necessary contacts” with leftist rebels for the release of two soldiers the guerrillas said they are prepared to free unilaterally. That news coincided with rumors that one of the prisoners due to be released, army Cpl. Pablo Emilio Moncayo, had managed to escape from the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC. “The government will provide the necessary guarantees and reiterates its readiness and willingness for this process to be completed as soon as possible,” President Alvaro Uribe’s administration said in a statement announcing the authorizations. FARC commanders said months ago that they were willing to unilaterally free Moncayo and Pvt. Josue Daniel Calvo and deliver the body of police Maj. Julian Ernesto Guevara, who died while in captivity. Until last week, Uribe had been insisting that the rebels hand over all 25 of the soldiers and police they are holding, but the FARC wants to trade 23 of those captives for some 500 jailed guerrillas, a few of whom have been extradited to the United States. The Colombian government has agreed to the FARC’s request that opposition Sen. Piedad Cordoba – instrumental in earlier prisoner releases – join Red Cross and church representatives on the mission to receive the soldiers. Cpl. Moncayo was captured on Dec. 21, 1997, in a rebel attack on the southern town of Cerro Patascoy and is one of the two soldiers who have spent the most time in captivity. His father, teacher Gustavo Moncayo, said Tuesday that a person he declined to identify had told him authorities had indications his son escaped from the insurgents. “Last night I received a call that a guerrilla communication was possibly intercepted in which they say Pablo Emilio escaped,” the elder Moncayo told Caracol Radio. Gustavo Moncayo has become known as the “peace walker” for trekking long distances on foot while wearing chains around his neck to call attention to the plight of his son and the other hostages. Uribe and the FARC accuse each other of having no real interest in negotiations and the president has instead favored rescue operations to free the hostages. One such mission last year, in which Colombian troops disguised as Red Cross workers freed former presidential candidate Ingrid Betancourt, three U.S. military contractors and 11 others, was a resounding success. Yet hostage families say the risks are too great, pointing to the deaths of 11 lawmakers during a clash several years ago between the rebels and army soldiers.last_img read more

Underrated soft skills that will help you succeed

first_imgEver wonder why you’ve been passed up for a promotion or are not experiencing the career advancement you thought you would? The reality is that there are various soft skills you may be overlooking that can be game changers when it comes to professional success. Here are three underrated skills that you should cultivate to get ahead in the workplace.FocusHaving the ability to fully concentrate on your task at hand is invaluable to strong job performance. There is a wide range of distractions in front of us at all times (i.e. social media) that can lead us down a path of unproductivity and procrastination. Developing the skill to truly focus on what’s important will keep you engaged and give your work more meaning.LoyaltyWhen your workplace goes through tough times, demonstrating your loyalty and dedication to the company will not go unnoticed. Your superiors will value your steadfastness and commitment especially when others have come and gone. No workplace is perfect, but learning to stick with your organization, your boss, and your coworkers through ups and downs will benefit you down the road.AdaptabilityIt can be difficult to accept change when things don’t go your way. Instead of being stubborn and inflexible, pivot and embrace alternate options. The most successful employees are those that are able to adapt to the changing pace of the industry. Keeping up with what’s current and demonstrating your skill for accepting and overcoming new challenges will lead you to greater career success and work achievements. 24SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Wendy Moody Wendy Moody is a Senior Editor with CUInsight.com. Wendy works with the editorial team to help edit the content including current news, press releases, jobs and events. She keeps … Web: www.cuinsight.com Detailslast_img read more

Flanders Armed Home Invasion Trio Sought

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Southampton Town Police are investigating an armed home invasion in which three men robbed a Flanders resident after unsuccessfully trying to kick in the door of a second home nearby.The trio was armed with a box cutter, a silver handgun and a shotgun when they stole cash from a Flanders Road homeowner before they fled the scene at 1:10 a.m., police said.Two minutes after the Flanders Road victim had called 911, police received a call that a trio matching that description had tried to kick in the door of an Albany Avenue home before they fled the scene empty handed, police said. Investigators believe that the Albany Avenue incident may have occurred first.Police searched the area but could not find the suspects, who all wore hooded sweatshirts and concealed their faces. The victim was not injured.Southampton Town Police detectives are continuing the investigation. They ask anyone with information on this incident to call them at 631- 728-5000 or the Crime Tips Hotline at 631-728-3454. Additionally, tips can now be left in e-mail form at [email protected] . All tips will be kept confidential.last_img read more

BLOG: You Still Have Time to Ask Your Facebook Town Hall Questions

first_img Budget News,  The Blog Hey Pennsylvania! Today, Governor Tom Wolf is holding a live Facebook Town Hall about his 2016-2017 Budget — and you still have time to participate.Ask the governor a question to answer live during the town hall by posting the question as a comment on the town hall event page. (And remember to invite your friends to attend the event, too!)So, if you haven’t yet, go to the event page right now, post your question for the governor as a comment, and tune into the live town hall at 3:30 PM today at Facebook.com/GovernorWolf to hear the governor answer your questions. By: The Office of Governor Tom Wolf SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Governor Tom Wolf will deliver his 2016-2017 Budget Address today at 11:30 AM. The speech will be live streamed on our website at governor.pa.gov/live. You can also find updates and behind-the-scenes content on the 2016-2017 budget announcement on our Facebook and Twitter all this week.Read more posts about Governor Wolf’s 2016-17 budget.Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolfcenter_img BLOG: You Still Have Time to Ask Your Facebook Town Hall Questions February 09, 2016last_img read more

Governor and First Lady Wolf Invite Public to Attend 2016 Capitol Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony

first_imgGovernor and First Lady Wolf Invite Public to Attend 2016 Capitol Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony November 29, 2016 Holidays,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf and First Lady Frances Wolf are asking the public to join them for the 2016 Capitol Christmas Tree Lighting ceremony at Noon on Friday, December 9, 2016 in the Rotunda of the Main Capitol Building in Harrisburg.“Each year, the Capitol Christmas Tree Lighting ceremony brings us all together to officially kick-off the holiday season in the Capitol Complex,” Governor Wolf said. “Frances and I look forward to spreading some holiday cheer with music, good tidings and the lighting of the state’s Christmas tree.”The Governor and First Lady will be joined by Pennsylvania Department of General Services Secretary Curt Topper and Reverend David Lovelace, Episcopal Church of St. John the Baptist in York. The West Hanover Elementary School Second Grade Chorus will perform and Santa Claus will make an appearance as well.The Governor will deliver a special holiday message and lead the audience for the countdown to light the Capitol Christmas Tree.This event is open to the public for those wishing to attend.Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolfcenter_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more